Macro Daylilies At Edisto Memorial Gardens In Orangeburg, SC: Part 3

Orangeburg Daylilies: Part 3

 

Part 3 is a continuation of the Orangeburg Daylilies posts from the Edisto Memorial Gardens In Orangeburg, South Carolina.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 2, click here.

 

 

Macro Daylily at Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg, South Carolina
Peachy

To purchase a print of Peachy click here
To view a larger version of Peachy click here

My Peachy composition allows you to look right down the throat of this pastel colored flower.  Being a color junkie, the pale pinks, oranges, and greens are not what I normally look for.  But, as I’ve previously posted, that’s a good thing.  Sometimes the more subdued colors are a nice change of pace (especially if they are different from what you usually see and even better if they are a departure from your typical palette).  You can think of it as expanding your horizons or simply trying something new.  For aesthetic reasons, I placed the anther farthest to the left on the upper, leftmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  I then focused on the larger foreground anther on the right side which created good sharpness across all of them.  Individual pieces of pollen on the anthers and filaments can be seen due to the high level of detail.

 

 

Macro Daylily at Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg, South Carolina
Pink Paradise

To purchase a print of Pink Paradise click here
To view a larger version of Pink Paradise click here

Pink Paradise was composed looking right down the flower’s throat as well, but the colors are decidedly different from Peachy.  They are much more bold and saturated as well as satisfying to my color junkie needs.  The gorgeous pinks and reds are a nice complement to the bright yellows and greens, and one of my artistic goals was to feature them as much as possible.  To accomplish that desire, I found an angle that would allow those colors to fill the top of the frame while lifting the stamen up and off of the bottom.  I also wanted to hold the anthers near the yellows as their darker colors are naturally enhanced against the more vibrant tones.  While I used the first foreground anther as my focal point, the extremely shallow depth of field, when shooting at two times life-size, only allowed the zone of sharpness to extend just behind it to the middleground anthers.  Even so, the high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

To see related pieces click here.

 

 

 

Macro abstract Daylily at Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg, South Carolina
Orange Curls

To purchase a print of Orange Curls click here
To view a larger version of Orange Curls click here

I was attracted to the flower in my Orange Curls piece because it was so different from what a normal daylily looks like.  It was immediately apparent that any composition using this subject would produce an abstract.  Since it was the only one in the area, and I didn’t have anything else to compare it to, I can’t say if this particular type of flower usually grows in this manner.  Perhaps it was lacking something or deformed in some way.  Whatever the case, I loved all the loopy, wavy lines Mother Nature endowed it with.  The stigma has character as well and is bent and curled like it had been abused.  Though the anthers aren’t as easy to see because they have the same color as the petals, I did place one at the lower, rightmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  I then used that anther as my focal point.  The high level of detail allows tiny dew drops to be seen.

 

 

To see related pieces click here

Author: Steven Dillon

Discover behind-the-scenes details, aesthetic decisions, artistic visions, and compositional choices for my pieces in The Artist’s Story posts.

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