Macro Abstract Crepe Myrtle At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Crepe Myrtle Abstracts

 

The Aiken County Historical Museum has a “U” shaped driveway with crepe myrtle trees that adorn the inside edges.  I had looked at and considered surface area compositions of the trees over the years, but never found anything that fully satisfied my artistic desires.  Since the trees are immediately behind the parking spots (i.e., just on the other side of the driveway), they are easy to notice as soon as you get out of your car or while putting your gear together.  On the morning that I composed the pieces in this post, the lighting and stage of bark shedding must have been perfect because the gorgeous colors and patterns that were previously underneath the bark instantly got my attention.  I surveyed several trees looking for aesthetically pleasing designs and the best colorations before setting up the tripod.

 

 

Macro abstract pattern and colors on Crepe Myrtle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
New Skin

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The bright yellows and warm oranges in New Skin initially attracted me to this particular area of the tree.  While framing the abstract pattern Mother Nature had painted and then exposed, I was reminded of a river with eddies and currents swirling around as if the colors themselves were flowing downstream from the top of the frame to the bottom.  The high level of detail allows texture to be seen.

 

 

Macro abstract pattern and colors on Crepe Myrtle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Mottled

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The randomly placed, splotchy, dappled areas in my Mottled piece made this abstract irresistible.  That being said, I must confess that the color junkie in me loved the various shades of oranges and reds.  This pattern felt more like a lava flow mixed with smoke or smoldering ashes as it oozes down through the frame.  Texture can be seen here as well thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

Macro abstract pattern and colors on Crepe Myrtle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Hot Skull

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I didn’t initially see this abstract pattern because it was not yet fully exposed.  Only a portion of it could be seen because the remaining area was covered with bark.  However, the bark was quite loose and seemed to be just barely hanging on.  My curiosity got the best of me, and I simply had to know what was under it.  When I gave it a little tug, the bark slipped right off and revealed what you see here in my Hot Skull piece.  I think that the gorgeous reds and really bright yellows exist because they have just been uncovered and haven’t had time to fade.  I was thrilled with the coloration, but more enticing was the design that looked like the outline of a skull (with eye and nose sockets and clenched teeth).  Seeing the reds and patterns with sharp tipped spikes instantaneously brought to mind flames and fire.  Who knew that Mother Nature was a Ghost Rider fan?  Cracks in the surface as well as texture can be seen here too due to the high level of detail.

 

 

To see related pieces click here, for a bonus image, see below.

 

 

Macro abstract pattern and colors on Crepe Myrtle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Peeled

To purchase a print of Peeled click here
To view a larger version of Peeled click here

 

Author: Steven Dillon

Discover behind-the-scenes details, aesthetic decisions, artistic visions, and compositional choices for my pieces in The Artist’s Story posts.

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