Floral Macros At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Museum Floral Macros

 

Macro daylily anthers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Daylily Anthers

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My Daylily Anthers piece was composed at two times life-size magnification.  In addition to the artistic satisfaction factor, I created it to establish what could be called a baseline.  That is, what my normal rig is capable of producing.  I recently purchased a Canon 500D Close-up Lens that can be added to my current rig to get close to three times life-size magnification.  Being at that level crosses over into an area known as extreme macro.  It creates a bit of a Frankenstein lens, but it was less expensive than going to something like an MP-E 65, and my hope was that I could sort of get my feet wet in extreme macro while using something that I was fairly comfortable with.  More from my Frankenstein lens to come…

 

 

Macro daylily stamens at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Stamen Pair

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Stamen Pair was composed with my Frankenstein lens and has a magnification that is more than two times life-size.  With more magnification, the depth of field, which was already razor thin, is reduced even further.  That makes for a wonderful background.  Though the zone of sharpness is really shallow, individual pieces of pollen can still be seen.

 

 

Macro periwinkle shooting star at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Rising Star

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My Rising Star piece was also composed with the Frankenstein lens.  In my mind’s eye, I immediately saw a star shape on the flower that appeared to be ascending.  I placed the center of the periwinkle where the top one third line (using the rule of thirds) cuts through it so that the star itself would be higher in the frame.  Tiny drops of water and individual hairs can be seen.

 

 

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Author: Steven Dillon

Discover behind-the-scenes details, aesthetic decisions, artistic visions, and compositional choices for my pieces in The Artist’s Story posts.

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