Macros And Abstracts At Yonce Farm In Ridge Spring, SC: Part 2

Macros And Abstracts: Part 2

 

Part 2 is a continuation of the Macros And Abstracts blog posts.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro daylily with gorgeous colors and chicken fat at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Purple Passion

To purchase a print of Purple Passion click here
To view a larger version of Purple Passion click here

The stunning colors of the daylily in my Purple Passion piece were impossible to ignore.  If this had been the only composition I was able to create that morning, I still would have felt that the trip had been worth it.  This quickly became one of my all-time favorite daylily images.  For me, there is so much to love about this: the gorgeous purples, magentas, reds, and greens, the pleating on the petals, and how the chicken fat rolls into the frame both near the center and along the bottom.  Pollen and surface textures are easily seen as well.

 

 

Macro daylily stamens with backlit petals at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Sun Kissed

To purchase a print of Sun Kissed click here
To view a larger version of Sun Kissed click here

For my Sun Kissed piece, I tried something that I had never done before with a daylily.  This flower was very backlit by golden hour light with no other lighting source or deflector/reflector use.  That really lit up the oranges and yellows in the background, but it also darkened portions of some anthers and caused others to nearly become silhouetted.  Similarly, that artistic decision created what appears to be a glowing area in the center of the focal point anther and on the pollen that surrounds it.  It was an interesting effect and one that I was determined to utilize.

 

 

Macro daylily stamens group and background at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Unique

To purchase a print of Unique click here
To view a larger version of Unique click here

The small stamen in my Unique piece all but forced me to create this composition.  I don’t know why it had a single stamen that was A) so much smaller than the others and B) not with the other group.  It was like an extra stamen or one that somehow had its growth stunted.  I also liked how the anthers were grouped and had formed a triangle shape.  I used an angle that placed the little stamen in the background between the arches of the normal stamens.  I also liked the pink and oranges in the background and the chicken fat.  Individual pieces of pollen and surface textures can be seen here too.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here.

 

 

Abstract macro strange growth on daylily at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Invader

To purchase a print of Invader click here
To view a larger version of Invader click here

The naturally abstract qualities of my Invader piece convinced me to create a composition of it.  I’m not exactly sure what this is.  It may have been some type of a fungus that attacked one of the daylilies.  At first glance I thought I was seeing a cool looking spider web with lots of pollen or tiny drops of dew in and on it.  Whatever it was, it appeared to be holding down one of the petals, an anther, and possibly even the stigma while potentially feeding off from its host.  And, it definitely met my interesting criteria for what to point the camera at.  Since it was on a lily, it also came with gorgeous colors.  Very fine, tiny hairs and polyp looking things can be seen thanks to the high level of captured detail.

 

 

Abstract macro deep inside daylily at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Origin

To purchase a print of Origin click here
To view a larger version of Origin click here

My Origin piece was a bit of an experiment.  I have created several daylily interior compositions over the years where I attempt to get the focal point as far down into the flower as possible.  That, by itself, creates a naturally abstract result.  However, none of my prior works have had a horizontal orientation.  Here, the filaments (and where they originate from) are the main attraction – especially with their colors and curved shapes.  I also loved how the anthers dissolved down into colors.  Creating this one was fun.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here.

Author: Steven Dillon

Discover behind-the-scenes details, aesthetic decisions, artistic visions, and compositional choices for my pieces in The Artist’s Story posts.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *