Macros And Abstracts At Yonce Farm In Ridge Spring, SC: Part 3

Macros And Abstracts: Part 3

 

Part 3 is a continuation of the Macros And Abstracts blog posts.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 2, click here.

 

 

Macro daylily stamens resemble arrows at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Quiver

To purchase a print of Quiver click here
To view a larger version of Quiver click here

I was attracted to the flower in my Quiver piece by the gorgeous reds, oranges, and yellows.  My artistic vision was to frame it so that the chicken fat created a bit of a border along the bottom and lower sides.  Additionally, I placed the anthers high enough in the frame to be well above the border.  Even though they are curved, in my mind’s eye, the stamen, with their arrowhead like anther shapes, reminded me of arrows.  Surface textures and tiny individual pieces of pollen can be seen.

 

 

Macro daylily stamens and secondary colored petals at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Secondary Colors

To purchase a print of Secondary Colors click here
To view a larger version of Secondary Colors click here

The greens, oranges, and purples in my Secondary Colors piece were quite appealing.  I also liked the creamy whites.  In fact, I made the artistic decision to frame this daylily so that section of colors had space to run along the top.  Interestingly, this particular variety of flower has filaments that have a section of orange that nearly matches the ring of oranges around the petals.  As an artist (and a confessed color junkie), I find the overall color coordination a nice touch.  For example, it has additional harmonious areas between the tops of the petals and the centers of the anthers.  Finally, the orange pollen contrasts nicely against the very dark outside of the anthers.

 

 

Macro daylily stamens and horizontal anther at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Odd Man Out

To purchase a print of Odd Man Out click here
To view a larger version of Odd Man Out click here

The gorgeous reds in my Odd Man Out piece called me over to this flower.  My artistic vision was to use the foreground petals and the stigma to create a border along the bottom of the frame.  I liked the overlapping petals and how the veins are visible.  I also found the quirky horizontal anther attractive as you don’t see that very often (e.g., I have only seen and captured that on one other occasion).  Surface textures and individual pieces of pollen are visible.

 

 

Macro daylily with multiple stigmas at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Enchanted

To purchase a print of Enchanted click here
To view a larger version of Enchanted click here

Of course, I loved the bold colors in my Enchanted piece, but I was equally enticed by how the petals unfolded and the pattern they created.  Additionally, the petal ribs and veins form what could loosely be described as leading lines that when followed carry your attention to the stamen and the flower core where it can burst back out and start the loop around the image all over again.  But that wasn’t the most intriguing part of this daylily, it has what appears to be multiple stigmas.  Bob had disappeared (likely to tend to other chores on his farm) or I would have asked him if he knew how one of his flowers could have up to five stigmas.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen that before on a daylily.  Perhaps it is one that he developed.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here

Author: Steven Dillon

Discover behind-the-scenes details, aesthetic decisions, artistic visions, and compositional choices for my pieces in The Artist’s Story posts.

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