Macros And Abstracts At Yonce Farm In Ridge Spring, SC: Part 4

Macros And Abstracts: Part 4

 

Part 4 is a continuation of the Macros And Abstracts blog posts.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 3, click here.

 

 

Abstract macro canna lily petal at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Red Rain

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I have always felt that canna lily petals have very nice naturally abstract patterns and shapes on them, and my artistic intent for Red Rain was to find an aesthetically pleasing arrangement of them.  As the petals are curved, finding an area that is flat simply isn’t possible.  Increasing the magnification helps a little because the slope is reduced as the surface area diminishes, but with a higher magnification the depth of field is shallower.  As I’ve written in many previous blog posts, photography is about concession management.  You likely can’t have everything you want, so you must accept the best you can get.

 

 

Abstract macro canna lily at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Big Wing

To purchase a print of Big Wing click here
To view a larger version of Big Wing click here

Some of the canna lilies at the Yonce Farm have very large stamens.  The stamen in my Big Wing piece was almost the size of a petal on the canna lilies I see at Hopeland Gardens.  I’m not sure if they are a specific type of canna lily or Bob’s plants are just really happy with the soil conditions and grow bigger.  At any rate, I loved the naturally abstract patterns of lines and shapes on the stamen as well as the colors.  Individual pieces of pollen are visible too.

 

 

Abstract macro canna lily throat at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Whirl

To purchase a print of Whirl click here
To view a larger version of Whirl click here

Once again, I loved the naturally abstract shapes and patterns on the canna lily in my Whirl piece, but my artistic intent was to create a composition that looked down into the flower.  In my mind’s eye, doing that produced a swirl like effect almost like the shapes were being pulled down a vortex.  Even the design of the stigma adds to that feeling with how it is curved and twisted.  As the flower itself was primarily backlit, I used a diffuser to even the light out and allow a deeper look down into it.

 

 

Abstract macro daylily filaments and petals at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Rise Up

To purchase a print of Rise Up click here
To view a larger version of Rise Up click here

My artistic vision for the flower in Rise Up was to create an abstract that featured lines.  I used the petals along the bottom to create a border and then placed the filaments and stigma on an angle coming up from the lower right-hand corner into the frame.  Additionally, the ribs and veins in the background originate from the same area and arch up and out into the frame in a similar manner.  As the anthers were beyond the zone of sharpness, they dissolved down into shapes and colors.

 

 

Abstract macro daylily petals at Yonce Farm in Ridge Spring, South Carolina
Petals

To purchase a print of Petals click here
To view a larger version of Petals click here

I was attracted to the flower in my Petals piece by the gorgeous purples, but after seeing how nicely the colors of this daylily flowed combined with how the flower’s petals overlapped, I immediately knew that I wanted to create another naturally abstract composition using them.  I placed the left side petal in the frame so that the edge of it weaves its way up diagonally.  I also used the edge as my focal point.  Surface textures can be seen here as well.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here

Author: Steven Dillon

Discover behind-the-scenes details, aesthetic decisions, artistic visions, and compositional choices for my pieces in The Artist’s Story posts.

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