Macro Abstract Leaf At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Fall Insinuation

 

Macro abstract leaf at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Fall Insinuation

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When I found this leaf near the south wall at the Aiken County Historical Museum it was starting to change colors, even though Fall hadn’t officially commenced.  The colors of the leaves on the bush where I discovered this had already transformed enough to call me over and, once there, forced a closer examination of them.  I selected this one for a couple of reasons: I loved the random patterns of decay and the colors it provided, it was relatively flat (which when shooting at two times life-size at such a close distance is an important consideration if you wish to maximize the zone of sharpness), it had some dew on the surface to enhance the colors, and its location had limited impediments to access.  The wind being calm was also another significant factor in obtaining my Fall Insinuation piece as I needed eight seconds of exposure time.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and individual dew drops to be seen.

 

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Macro Abstract Tree Sap At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 9

Tree Sap: Part 9

Part 9 is a continuation of the Tree Sap blog posts from Hopeland Gardens.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 8, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Spiked Drops

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The unusual shape of the sap in my Spiked Drops piece is what attracted me to it.  If you’ve been following my Tree Sap posts, then you’ll recall that there were two limbs that had been cut.  This was under the smaller limb and was hanging down far enough that the extremely shallow depth of field, when shooting at two times life-size, reduced most of the background bark down to simple colors.  Both larger drops have nice reflections and refractions.  I loved the smaller tapered drop and wondered how it could have been formed in that manner without colliding with the larger drop and being absorbed.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Molten

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Molten is the final sap composition I was able to create.  I was surprised that a collection of sap so large still had such good clarity.  Most of the sap runs had at least started to dry and were turning a milky color.  These drops were lower on the tree trunk beneath the area where the larger limb had been trimmed.

 

I love the colors that the lowest drop on the bottom has pulled in and the color striations in all of the drops.  They also have some very nice multicolored refractions and colorful reflections.

 

The pieces in this series of blog posts, taken as a whole, feel like some type of a project – especially since I became accustomed to shooting at their location.  I was able to create compositions nearly all season long starting from the time I first discovered the limbs had been cut and the tree had sap running down it.  When there wasn’t much to point my camera at on any given day, I knew that I could at least get something from the sap tree.

 

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Macro Abstract Hibiscus Leaf At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Meal Design

 

Macro abstract partially consumed Hibiscus leaf at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Meal Design

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My Meal Design piece consists of three basic components: a hibiscus leaf, sepal, and petal.  I loved the design cut into the yellow leaf likely by some type of insect that had eaten it.  I placed it in the frame so that the midrib would run diagonally while filling the bug holes with the colors of the petal behind it.  With a bit of aesthetic luck, the ribs of the background petal were also running up the frame on diagonal lines.  I couldn’t do much with the green sepal as it was connected to the petal, but I felt that it was fine adding just a touch of additional color to the lower corner.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and individual fibers to be seen.

 

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Macro Abstract Tree Bark At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Tree Bark

 

Macro abstract tree bark at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Black Stars

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The discovery of the scene in my Black Stars piece was serendipitous.  I found it on one of the trees along the sidewalk on the side of the house at the Aiken County Historical Museum and it wasn’t what I initially set out to capture.  What originally attracted me to this area was some patches of nice pastel colors and a whole lot of holes burred into the bark in lines.  After setting up the tripod and getting my first view, the lens was pointing toward a spot without any of the holes, but the star patterns more than made up for that.  With the morning sun not yet up that far, it was pretty dark back there between the house and the wall, and this creation required 25 seconds of exposure time (which for macro is a fairly long exposure).  Interestingly, after I had captured several frames of the stars, I took a look at the scene I had originally intended to frame – it wasn’t artistically pleasing.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

 

Macro abstract tree bark at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Earth Tones

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Coming around the side of the house and out into the front yard, I noticed a pine tree being lit by the sunrise.  The golden light enhanced the bark that was peeling off in nice abstract patterns and I was thrilled with its colors.  I examined the trunk for the area that had the best color in combination with the most aesthetic design.  I loved the oranges, yellows, and browns in my Earth Tones composition.  Surface textures can be seen here as well thanks to the high level of detail.

 

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Macro Abstract Tree Sap At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 8

Tree Sap: Part 8

Part 8 is a continuation of the Tree Sap blog posts from Hopeland Gardens.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 7, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Big Drop

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The sap in my Big Drop composition produced one of the largest single drops I had seen while creating these pieces.  I liked the mostly moss filled green background and this drop had a little bit of everything going for it.  For example, it has a couple of very nice sunstars, pulled in and warped background colors, pretty blue reflections, rainbow and multicolored refractions, and crystalline strained and stretched areas.  Simply put, I couldn’t resist it.

 

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Macro Abstract Leaf At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Lava Leaf

 

Macro abstract leaf at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Lava Leaf

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Lava Leaf is from the same swampy area of Hopeland Gardens that produced Fire Veins.  In fact, they are both from the same type of leaf.  Additionally, it was backlit by the golden toned light of the rising sun.  I loved the colors and the design created by the skin transformation as the leaf passes through its final stages of life.  Upon finding this particular area of the leaf, it immediately made me think of molten rock streams flowing and mixing together as they pour from a volcano.  Discovering scenes like this is a major reason why I love shooting abstract macros so much.

 

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Macro Abstract Turtle Shell At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Turtle Shell

All of the pieces in this post are from the same box turtle at the Aiken County Historical Museum that I posted about previously.  He let me get quite close to him without pulling inside his shell or trying to scuttle away.  These naturally abstract patterns come from his back and were created by pointing the lens down toward his shell.

 

 

Macro abstract Box turtle shell at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Expand

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I was attracted to the area in my Expand composition primarily because of the colorful patterns.  The main portion of the piece is a single scale with a darker edge that marks its boundary as it contacts the other scales around it.  I loved the lines that trace the general outline of the scale and wondered if they were like the rings of a tree that could be counted to determine the age of the turtle.  It certainly appeared to me that as this guy grew, his scales got bigger and, at some point, left an indentation that marked the end of a specific life period.  I also marveled at his toughness.  Something may have tried to eat him and, if so, perhaps their teeth punctured the main scale causing it to break and form a depression.

 

 

Macro abstract Box turtle shell at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Armor

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For my Armor composition, I slid the camera over to the left, switched the orientation to horizontal, and recomposed.  While the pattern on the left scale is quite distinctly different from the pattern on the right, artistically, I felt that they worked well together.

 

 

Macro abstract Box turtle shell at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Shield

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I loved the pattern created by the yellows and oranges in Shield.  For this piece, I composed down his spine.  I loved how the top color blobs appeared to be being pushed away from the area where the two scales meet.  As if the force of the bottom scale colliding with the top scale caused everything to shoot outward.  The design of the lines in the top scale increase that feeling by having the appearance of waves that grow out and away from the epicenter.

 

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Macro Abstract Canna Lily At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC: Part 2

Abstract Canna Lilies: Part 2

Part 2 is a continuation of the Abstract Canna Lilies posts from the same plant group in the big back garden at the Aiken County Historical Museum.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract Canna Lily at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Undulating

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I was called over to the lily in my Undulating composition by its bold colors.  In fact, this flower had the most attractive colors out of any I had seen blooming from this group all season.  But, I was even more impressed with the pattern they created.  I loved how the petals felt like waves rolling away from and crashing back into the center.  The high level of detail allows individual dew drops and surface texture to be seen.

 

 

Macro abstract Canna Lily at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Inner Smile

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Inner Smile is essentially the vertical companion to Undulating.  Though the pattern the colors form is the same, it does have a different feel when viewed vertically.  Thanks to the high level of detail, individual dew drops and surface texture can be seen here as well.

 

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Macro Abstract Waggie Windmill At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Waggie Windmill

 

Macro abstract Waggie Windmill Palm fronds at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Waggie Windmill

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I can’t even remember how many times I’ve looked for a composition using the palm tree in my Waggie Windmill piece.  I have always felt that it held an artistically pleasing creation waiting to be uncovered, but over the years I’ve wandered the Hopeland Gardens grounds, I never found the right combination (i.e., too much wind, poor lighting, bent or broken fronds, etc.).  But on this particular morning, all the pieces fell into place.  The fronds were being backlit by the morning sun, the wind was calm, and the fronds had no imperfections.  I loved the gorgeous green and yellow colors and the nearly perfect geometric pattern.  Mother Nature even gave me a bonus – dew drops.  I was thrilled to finally have the opportunity to reveal the beauty I knew was there, and I quickly took advantage of it before any of the key ingredients were lost.

 

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Macro Abstract Mushrooms At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Mushrooms

 

Macro abstract mushrooms at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Smoked

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I loved how the light was filtering through the layers and creating an orange tone in my Smoked piece.  I discovered these mushrooms growing on a tree in Hopeland Gardens near the spot where all the green tree frogs were found earlier in the year.  There were quite a few of them sprouting at various heights and in different areas.  I walked around the tree checking compositions and framings until I was sure that I wanted to create with this group.

It seemed to have quite a lot of visible particles and/or dirt on the surfaces so I blew on it to try to remove some of the debris (as I’ve previously posted, I normally like to clean subjects in the field).  This thing had a ton of bugs inside it and they started pouring out of every nook and cranny.  Ants, maggot looking worms, flies, and who knows what else.  I was quite surprised by how many bugs steadily streamed past me, but it must have something that they want or need.  Or maybe they just liked it because it was stinky and smelled like it was rotten.  It took a couple of times to expel the fragments and each time progressively fewer bugs emerged.

I wasn’t able to capture the coolest thing that happened.  While I was between compositions, it started to emit something that looked like smoke.  Likely some type of pollen, the substance was thick enough to where the inside of the mushroom appeared to be on fire.

 

 

Macro abstract mushrooms at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Frilly

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Frilly was composed using mushrooms from the same group as Smoked.  I loved the lacy edges and soft flaps under their surfaces.  My artistic goal was to capture the layers of ornate rolls and pleated edges as they wind their way across the frame.

 

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