Macro Abstract Wet Flower Center at Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Bubbling Yellow

 

Macro abstract wet flower center at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Bubbling Yellow

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There are some small bushes between the driveway and the east side of the building at the Aiken County Historical Museum.  I’ve inspected the nice little blooms they produce for a composition several times over the years, but wasn’t ever satisfied with what I was able to create.  My artistic goal was to fill the entire frame with the flower (something that is difficult to do because of their relatively diminutive size).  However, on the morning I created my Bubbling Yellow piece, I found a bush that had a flower on it that was just a bit bigger than what I’ve previously come across.  I placed the core of the flower slightly off center to that it could expand out and down toward the bottom of the frame.  I was thrilled with the wet surfaces and dew drops that add additional visual interest, and I love all the loops and arcs.

 

 

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Macro Flowers At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Potted

 

Macro flowers at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Potted

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The main reflecting pool (i.e., the largest one with the water fountains in it) in Hopeland Gardens has flowerpots at each corner of the rectangular shaped pond.  I’ve written a previous post about how the grounds keepers usually have some type of flowers or flora display in them, which is why I normally make my way to that area each time I’m on site searching for subjects.  The bright flowers in Potted caught my attention as I wound around one of the flowerpots.  My artistic goal was to fill the frame with as many flowers as I could while being close enough to capture the patterns in their throats and pollen swollen anthers.  Additionally, I wanted the background to be as dark as it could be so that the flowers would pop against it.  To find a suitable scene took a couple of passes around each of the flowerpots before returning to the one that initially caught my eye.  I then had to locate a group where the flowers were closely crowded together and experiment with various framings until I found one that I desired.  I focused on the stigma and anthers of the flower in the lower left-hand corner of the frame and got lucky that the distance to the camera’s sensor was nearly identical to the flower in the upper right-hand side.  Which allowed both of the flower’s throat areas to fall within the zone of sharpness.  The high level of detail allows texture and tiny hairs to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Gladiolus At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Hopeland Gardens Gladiolus

 

Sometimes you just have to give nature some help, which was the case the morning I composed the pieces in this post.  While surveying the area where I had found one years ago, I discovered two gladiolus plants next to each other that were lying flat on the ground.  They were both dead to the world and did not have the ability to stand on their own.  I have no idea what happened to them though an animal may have knocked them over, or perhaps it was the wind, or maybe their blossoms just got too heavy to hold up.  At any rate, it seemed like a real shame to have that much beauty going to waste.  One stalk was fairly tore up and the flowers were not in good shape at all, and the second had a couple of pretty decent looking blooms as well as others that were being overrun by ants.  I picked up the better of the two so that I could examine the flowers a bit closer.  After I felt that a composition existed, I tried to get it balanced or propped up high enough to where I could comfortably get my lens on it, but that didn’t work – it just fell right back down again.  So I got my plamp out and, after cleaning as many of the ants off from it as I could, I connected one of the clamps so that it would keep the plant from falling over.

 

 

Macro Gladiolus at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Reincarnated

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After effectively bringing the plant back to life, I searched for an artistically pleasing flower.  For my Reincarnated composition, I placed the center stalk of the stigma on the upper, leftmost one third line, using the rule of thirds.  Then while keeping the stigma at that location in the frame, I maneuvered the camera around to where the anthers had approximately the same amount of space to their respective side.  I focused on the stigma because it felt too prominent against the pink background to ignore.  The extremely shallow depth of field didn’t allow much else to fall into the zone of sharpness, and I wouldn’t argue too much against this being classified as naturally abstract.  However, the uniformity of the filaments, anthers, and stigma stalks (i.e., three, three, and three) helped convince me not to do that.  The high level of detail allows tiny hairs and texture to be seen.

 

 

Macro Gladiolus at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Stance

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While scouring the best remaining, ant-free blooms, I found one that I liked.  I decided to move the plamp into a position that would continue supporting the weight of the stalk and hold the flower steadier since the wind had started to pick up as the morning ticked away.  I focused at the top of the stigma here as well and that worked out pretty good considering the angle of the anthers.  I like how they slowly fade away.  I was also pleased with how the filaments blended right into the background of my Stance piece because it creates the illusion that the anthers are floating.  Tiny hairs and texture can be seen here too thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

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Abstract Leaves At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Flame On

 

Abstract leaves at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Flame On

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Sometimes we have to work on a subject (or a group of subjects) over the course of several weeks before getting exactly what we want out of it.  Even if you produce many different pieces and you aren’t happy with any of them, don’t give up when you know that there is a composition just waiting for you to find it.  That’s the story behind my Flame On piece.

 

The subjects here were new to Hopeland Gardens, and I had been working about six of them every time I wandered the grounds.  I tried numerous framing options and had taken home lots of images that I subsequently rejected.  I would usually work them for a few minutes during a visit before moving on, so they were, in a manner of speaking, bothering me (i.e., I couldn’t quite get what I desired, but I felt it was there someplace).  And every time that it didn’t work was difficult because they were very attractive to the color junkie in me due to their brilliant colors.  The interesting thing is that you have to view them at the right angle.  When the morning sun backlit them, the reds and pinks in the leaves lit up like flames and drew me in as if I was a moth.  Each time that I reviewed and threw out images, I would come away with a better idea of what I wanted to try during my next opportunity.  On the morning this was composed, I was sure that I could find an angle and position that would allow me to create what had eluded me for a couple of months.  After cleaning up a few spider webs that were flailing around, I finally got the right lighting and wind conditions and found a distance and perspective that pleased my inner artist.  I wanted to fill the frame with as many of the gorgeous flame-like leaves as I could, which, in and of itself, produced a more abstract feel.  I considered the randomly placed dew drops a nice little bonus.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Wet Hydrangea At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Wet Hydrangea

 

Macro abstract wet hydrangea at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Wet Hydrangea

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I was attracted by the blues and purples in my Wet Hydrangea piece, and I had been wanting to create an abstract macro composition that featured hydrangea for a long time.  I searched over several bushes in Hopeland Gardens until I found a group of petals that just felt right artistically.  The foreground petals as well as the layers beneath them were nicely laid out, and the wet surfaces both enhanced the saturation and increased the abstract feel at the same time.  To bring a little sense of order to the scene, I placed the bud in the center of the foreground petals so that the rightmost one third line, using the rule of thirds, nearly bisected it.  That also allowed the leftmost foreground petal to remain within the frame, which was an important aesthetic concern since it is the subject’s most prominent attribute.  I also really like the abstract designs from the reflections off the petal’s wet surface.  Then I used the bud as my focal point to amplify its relative importance.  Because of the bud’s height, that brought many of the dew drops scattered around the petals into the zone of sharpness.  The high level of detail allows texture to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Wandering Jew Petals Form Butterfly Wings At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Butterfly Wings

 

Macro Wandering Jew petals form butterfly wings at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Butterfly Wings

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I don’t normally see two wandering Jew flowers growing so close to one another.  In fact, this was the very first time I had ever seen a pair that had petals touching each other, and their proximity caused me to see a familiar pattern in my mind’s eye.  Taken as a whole, the outside petals on both sides appear to create the shape of butterfly wings.  I didn’t want the wings to feel centered in the frame, so I left a little more space above and on the right side of the petals.  That caused the flowers to be placed in the frame where the left flower’s core/center is very near the lower, leftmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  With the anthers scattered around in different groups as well as being considerably above the surface of the petals (especially considering the shallow depth of field), I selected the rope-like strands that grow out of the filaments as my focal point.  That aesthetic decision simultaneously forced the anthers to be out of focus and enhanced the surface of the petals including the pollen that had fallen on them.  The high level of detail allows texture, dew drops, and individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Coneflower At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Centrifugal

 

Macro abstract coneflower at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Centrifugal

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The coneflower in my Centrifugal piece was so vibrant and fresh that I had to create a composition with it.  For artistic reasons, I placed the center of the flower very near the center of the frame.  That produced a feeling of expanding outward like a controlled explosion of colors.  It also allows the sharpness to fall off in even amounts starting from the center, where the focal point is, and heading across the frame toward both sides.  The morning dew enhanced the saturation and provided a good deal of satisfaction for my color junkie cravings.  After processing this one, it immediately became my new favorite coneflower.  Individual pieces of pollen can be seen thanks to the high level of captured detail.

 

 

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Macro Honeysuckle At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Spread Your Wings

 

Macro honeysuckle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Spread Your Wings

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My artistic vision for Spread Your Wings was to capture how the honeysuckle petals reminded me of wings.  In my mind’s eye, what I saw upon discovering these subjects was the familiar shape of arched bird wings as they are flying.  I placed the petals so that they opened up horizontally and flowed across the frame.  As it was early morning and I was on the north side of the museum building, I was working without much sunlight.  Even so, I searched for an angle that gave me the darkest possible background so that the white petals would pop against it.  Since there was no way to ignore the stamens or stigmas, I focused on the anther of the first (and tallest) stamen and let everything else fall where it was in the zone of sharpness.  That worked out pretty good because I really like being able to see all the tiny little hairs that run up the flower and out to the petal edges.  The high level of detail also allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Leaves Covered By Web Full Of Dew At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Dew Veil

 

Macro abstract leaves covered by web full of dew at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Dew Veil

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As I was walking through the Rye Patch Rose Garden looking for subjects, I discovered a naturally abstract scene that I couldn’t pass without further investigation.  The Rose Garden is an enclosed area with two side entrances that each have a swinging door.  Within the garden boundaries are hedges that are usually neatly trimmed in a rectangular shape that further segregate the various areas.  On top of one of the hedge rows was a web that was completely covered in dew.  Upon closer examination of the area I subsequently captured in Dew Veil, I was struck by how I could see the leaves underneath the web while at the same time the drops of dew created a mask over them.  It was a curious effect and almost felt as if I was looking at leaves that had been embedded in glass.  I found a group of leaves that had a couple of tips poking up and out of the web as well as other leaves surrounding it in an artistic manner.  I then placed that group in the frame so that the rightmost vertical one third line, using the rule of thirds, nearly bisected them.  To achieve side-to-side sharpness across the entire frame, a technique known as focus stacking was employed.  The high level of captured detail allows web strands and a whole bunch of tiny dew drops to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Heart Shaped Leaf At Hitchcock Woods In Aiken, SC

I Heart Nature

 

Macro heart shaped leaf at Hitchcock Woods in Aiken, South Carolina
I Heart Nature

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Hitchcock Woods is an amazing resource to have right in our city, and I’ve written about it in previous blog posts.  That being said, I don’t usually hunt for subjects within it using my macro rig.  But, this particular morning I didn’t have any luck finding something to point my camera at on the grounds of the Aiken County Historical Museum so I decided to hike down some of the horse trails to see what I could find.

The leaf in my I Heart Nature piece immediately drew me in primarily due to its shape.  After all, the heart symbol is a universal ideograph that represents love, and, being a nature lover, I had a strong desire to capture a scene expressing that sentiment.  I also found the greens quite attractive.  In fact, one of my artistic goals was to find an angle that allowed me to fill the background with as much green as possible while avoiding the creation of darker brown areas where the dirt on the ground could be seen behind/under the leaves.  Additional aesthetic concerns were leaf placement (both angle and position in the frame) as well as depth of field control.  I put the leaf in the sensor on a diagonal so that it wouldn’t feel static or centered even though I gave the subject about the same amount of breathing room on either side and kept the distance from the top of the frame nearly equal to the space at the bottom.  I sought as much detail as I could get in and on the leaf’s surface, but I also wanted the background to quickly fade away.  When there is sufficient distance from the subject to the background, depth of field can be increased while maintaining good bokeh, but when objects in the background are close to the subject, you have to compromise.  In this case, I had to open the lens incrementally until I found the right amount for this composition (i.e., where I was getting as much detail as possible from the subject while simultaneously decreasing features of the background leaves).  This is another time where your camera’s depth of field preview really pays off because you can use it to dial in the setting while you observe the effect across your work.  Even though I reduced the depth of field, the high level of captured detail allows surface texture to be seen.

 

 

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