Macro Abstract Tree Sap At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 5

Tree Sap: Part 5

Part 5 is a continuation of the Tree Sap blog posts from Hopeland Gardens.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 4, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Flat Drop

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I was attracted to the sap in my Flat Drop piece primarily because of its shape.  It seems to be expanding horizontally and getting wider instead of longer.  Which is curious because gravity should be pulling it down.  I also liked the color striations and patterns inside the sap.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Crystal Streak

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The run of sap in Crystal Streak caught my eye because of how clear (almost like glass) it was.  I decided to frame it diagonally for several aesthetic reasons.  First, it was so skinny that placing it vertically wasn’t nearly as visually interesting.  Secondly, the gap created by the moss and bark added visual interest when placed beside it diagonally, but seemed to take away from it when vertical.  And finally, the moss seemed to create a diagonal bed for the run to lay on with open bark areas in opposite corners (which didn’t exist when it was turned vertically).  Even though it is thin, there are some nice colorful refractions and reflections.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Light Catchers

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With a bit more golden hour light on the scene in my Light Catchers composition, I moved the lens down the tree a little.  Essentially, I placed the tip of the top drop on the first upper crossing line using the rule of thirds.  That drop is also at the end of the sap run in Crystal Streak, and I loved how it was throwing light on the bark beside it.  I also liked the random, abstract shape of the larger blob near the bottom of the frame and the fact that they are located diagonally from each other with the moss covered gap in the bark connecting them.  Both areas have wonderfully colored reflections and refractions (with the top drop having rainbow like colors) as well as sunstars.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Tree Sap At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 4

Tree Sap: Part 4

Part 4 is a continuation of the Tree Sap blog posts from Hopeland Gardens.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 3, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Gathering Colors

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If you’ve been following my previous posts in this series, then you know that I had been composing around the areas where the limbs had been trimmed from the tree.  At this point, those spots no longer had the most interesting subjects.  Gathering Colors comes from sap that has dripped and run down onto the tree trunk.  I loved the color striations and patterns being pulled into the two large drops.  I also liked how the moss acts as a natural highlighter (i.e., it is positioned around the sap and only has a small amount of direct influence) as well as the flatter stretched and strained area immediately above the large drop with its crystalline reflections.  The smaller double drip on the side was a bonus.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen (especially on the bark).

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Drips

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I framed the sap in Drips so that it would be on a diagonal.  That aesthetic decision was made primarily because I wanted to ensure that I could include all three of the larger drops.  I especially liked the pattern created in the middle drop with the refractions, reflections, and surrounding colors being pulled in.  Though it’s on a bit of an angle, I also liked that the drop in the top right corner has a classic teardrop shape.  Surface textures on the drops can be seen thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Flooded

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I utilized a completely different perspective for my Flooded piece.  Instead of lining up the camera’s sensor with the sap to maximize the amount of sharpness available in the shallow depth of field, I traded that in for a distinctive feel.  I made the aesthetic decision to shoot up at the drops to provide more of a sense that they were running down toward the viewer.  I loved the colors lit up under the sap and the reflections off from it as well as both clear and dark colored drops.  With the high level of detail, surface textures can also be seen here.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Tree Sap At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 1

Tree Sap: Part 1

I discovered the sap in this series of posts on a conifer in Hopeland Gardens that had recently been trimmed (likely due to some type of storm damage).  I was near the reflecting pools when I noticed an area on the trunk of a tree where a limb was missing and decided to investigate it for potential abstract patterns.  Upon arriving at the tree, I found sap dripping down along the edges of two severed limbs and some very cool abstract designs.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Tears

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In my mind’s eye, the design of the sap in Tears made me think of crying.  As if the tree’s open wounds were painful or it was mourning the loss of a photosynthesis contributor.  The limbs had likely been removed just days earlier and with the wet weather we had, the interior color of the wood was gorgeous.  Being a confessed color junkie, I had to get as much of those rusty oranges in the frame as possible, but I also liked how the moss and bark brought their own distinct layers.  Artistically, there was a little bit of a fight going on between colors and sap (I didn’t want the color layers to be too even in the amount of frame real estate they were taking up, but keeping the big, reflection warping, main drop close to a crossing line using the rule of thirds was also an important consideration).  As is normal with photography, a compromise, in some form, is often necessary.  I love the colors under the surface of the sap and the blues being reflected off the various surfaces.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen and you can almost feel the stretching and pulling of the sticky sap (especially in larger sizes).

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Globs

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The colors in the big, main drop of my Globs piece attracted me to this tiny scene.  I loved how the sunlight was bouncing around inside the sap creating wonderfully colorful refractions with their own patterns and designs.  While there was essentially no moss in this particular spot, plenty of the gorgeous rusty oranges and browns from the bark created a nice backdrop.  Since they add a touch of blue, I was pleased with the reflections here as well.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen here too.

 

 

Macro abstract tree sap at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Hook Shot

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I was intrigued with the shape and color of the sap in Hook Shot.  This particular run of sap was completely within the interior of the missing limb.  That meant that there would be no fight between color and sap for frame placement – the entire background consists of the rusty oranges.  Artistically, I still placed the bulk of the sap (i.e., the larger bottom drop) at a crossing line using the rule of thirds.  The little hole near the bottom of the frame that something burred into the surface was simply a bonus that provides additional visual interest.  While I have no idea what caused it and it is quite curious, I loved how the sap went from a crystalline clear color to a gorgeous ruby red.  Surface texture is visible here as well thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Tree Bark At Dreher Island State Park In Prosperity, SC

Flakes

Macro abstract pine tree bark at Dreher Island State Park in Prosperity, South Carolina
Flakes

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After working the area near the shelter where we had lunch, we hiked down a connector trail that leads to the Little Gap Trail.  I discovered the bark in my Flakes composition on a side trail that leads down to the water.  I was initially attracted to the bark by the abstract patterns, but the colors convinced me that I needed to find a way to fill a frame with them.  I searched the surface until I found a section that piqued my artistic eye.  My goal was to pull in as much color as possible with an interesting design while keeping as much of the rougher outer layer of bark out of the frame.

 

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Macro Abstract Pine Sap At Dreher Island State Park In Prosperity, SC

Pine Sap

Near the end of June, we took an excursion up to Dreher Island State Park.  We found an open shelter on Sweet Gum and claimed a spot.  I did some scouting in the woods and along the shoreline before having a very good picnic lunch.  After eating, I continued to explore near the water’s edge and came across some pine trees that had large areas of bark that had been stripped away (likely from a beaver).  All of the images in this post are compositions featuring sap found on the trees in that area.

 

Macro abstract pine tree sap at Dreher Island State Park in Prosperity, South Carolina
Fractured

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I loved the almost crystalline or icy look of the sap in my Fractured piece, but I was also attracted to the scene by the gorgeous colors underneath it.  It felt quite abstract with the scratches, gashes, and gouges randomly scattered all across the surface.  The most colorful areas reminded me of rock candy.  My artistic approach was fairly simple; maximize the amount of surface breaks while pulling in the most color.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen (the tiny stress/compaction lines are amazing).

 

 

Macro abstract pine tree sap at Dreher Island State Park in Prosperity, South Carolina
Orange Cracks

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The area where my Orange Cracks composition came from had some great colors.  I was immediately drawn to the lush oranges below the white, flaky coating.  The difficulty was that the surface of the sap was littered with the corpses of all different types of bugs.  They apparently got stuck in the sap and then, because they couldn’t break free, died on the surface.  New sap continued to drip down and cover some of the bodies so that they became embedded.  Searching for a section that had good color and was relatively clean (and free of bug bodies), was challenging.  This perspective brought to mind some type of tasty, frozen or shaved ice, orange drink or perhaps broken pieces of hard candy.

 

 

Macro abstract pine tree sap at Dreher Island State Park in Prosperity, South Carolina
Sap Channel

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I was excited to discover the two, big, active drips in my Sap Channel piece.  The coating on either side of them reminded me of cracked and broken sheets of ice in a river that looked like they could be flowing downstream.  Artistically, I preferred the frame in a position to where the channel ran across and down it diagonally.  While not possible to recognize in a static capture, I was able to see the sap trickle down the furrow.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and reflections off the sap to be seen.

 

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Eastern Redbud At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Blooming Bark

Macro Eastern Redbud at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Blooming Bark

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I was exploring Hopeland Gardens one spring afternoon when I discovered a collection of bright, colorful buds sticking out of some trees.  Not having seen anything quite like them before, I was immediately intrigued.  I composed Blooming Bark so that the buds were the focal point while holding enough background to show that they were literally popping out of the tree.  There were clusters in various sizes and numbers (just like this) all over several nearby trees.  Nature never ceases to amaze me.

 

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Climbing Vine At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Climbing

Macro vine at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Climbing

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The bark on these trees in Hopeland Gardens creates random patterns as it peels off and falls to the ground.  The red, tan, and brown colors underneath the bark are also attractive.  But the vine in Climbing is what caught my attention.  While it appears to be secure, there is plenty of evidence of previous vines that were unable to stay attached and the remains of their anchors create additional shapes and designs.  I felt this told a story of determination, continued growth, and how nature exudes perseverance.

 

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