Macro Abstract Dew Covered Rose Bud At The Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Wet Paint

 

Macro abstract dew covered rose bud at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Wet Paint

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I was initially attracted to the rose bud in my Wet Paint piece by the colors, which will not be a surprise to anyone who has been reading this blog for a while.  Those gorgeous oranges and reds were appealing from the entrance door all the way across the Rose Garden at the Rye Patch.  As I got closer to the subject, my artistic vision was to add to my Naturally Abstract gallery by focusing on a specific section of the bud.  One of the things that fascinates me about macro photography is how just being physically close to something while simultaneously using magnification can break it down into simple colors and lines.  In this case, to the point of not even being able to tell that it’s a flower.  I love that, and to achieve it, I composed this at two times life-size.  There was a bit of wind the morning I created this and, while I had a Plamp holding the bud, I lowered the F-stop to gain back a little shutter speed.  Doing that further reduced the already razor thin depth of field, but that also amplified the aesthetic effect I wanted.  The colors reminded me of paint, as if someone had pulled a brush across the frame, and the tiny dew drops that completely cover the surface provide a wet look.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Azalea Petal Edge Divides Colors At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Curtain

 

Macro abstract azalea petal edge divides colors at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Curtain

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With all of the azalea flowers on the north east side of the Aiken County Historical Museum, I was certain that I could find a worthy subject among them.  I used the edge of an azalea petal to create the naturally abstract composition in my Curtain piece.  My artistic vision was to split the image diagonally where one part featured the petal’s edge and the flower it belonged to while the other section is an entirely different azalea blossom.  That took quite a bit of exploring blooms and trying different angles until I found a flower that had the colors I wanted behind it with an edge that wasn’t burned, discolored, or chewed up.  Additionally, the edge had to be far enough away from the details in the center that they would dissolve into colors even at a high F-stop, which was required to keep most of edge sharply in focus.  Of course, composing at two times life-size helped because the depth of field is quite shallow.  Even with that, surface texture along the petal edge can be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Magnolia Petals Form Flame Shape In Aiken, SC

Magnolia Flame

 

Macro abstract magnolia petals form flame shape in Aiken, South Carolina
Magnolia Flame

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I was pulled over to the magnolia tree in a neighbor’s yard where I found the blossom in my Magnolia Flame piece by all of the flowers on the ground.  From a distance, it looked like there was a layer of pink surrounding the entire base of the tree.  I thought I might be able to create a naturally abstract composition from the flowers that had fallen off, but as I got closer it became clear that the remnants didn’t completely cover the grass and they were in fairly poor shape.  Not wanting to come home empty handed, I searched the branches for a new, better subject.  This particular bloom was fresh with excellent colors that drew me right in.  The shape that the petals formed immediately made me think of a flame (as if the fire from a candle was burning in a gorgeous pink tone).  Even though it was shot wide open with a very shallow depth of field, details including the surface texture and pollen can be seen.

 

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Macro Fall Flowers At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Fall Flowers

 

Given that it was already November, I wasn’t expecting to see much color from new blooms at the Aiken County Historical Museum (or anywhere, for that matter).  So, I was pleasantly surprised when I spotted some as I was driving in.  The flowers in this post were just off the driveway in front of the building.  In fact, I was kneeling on the driveway, and I had the tripod on the pavement while composing them.

 

 

Macro Fall flowers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Autumn Bunch

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My artistic goal for Autumn Branch was to fill the frame with as much of the flower’s gorgeous colors as I could.  First, I searched through the various groups of flowers with just my eyes, and then where I felt possible compositions existed, I looked through those clusters with the lens.  While I wasn’t quite able to completely fill the entire frame, I did come close.  Having a viewfinder with 100% coverage helps in situations like this because you know what you are seeing is what you will get and no cropping will be needed in post.  I placed the focal point on the leftmost flower and had enough depth in the zone of sharpness to sharply capture petals and pollen on flowers that were behind it.  The high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

Macro Fall flowers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
November Highlights

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The morning sun was providing side lighting for my November Highlights piece, which caused the yellows to almost glow.  One of my artistic goals was identical to those I had for Autumn Bunch in that I wanted to fill the entire frame with flowers.  While I searched for a collection of flowers that met that desire, I also wanted to create a prominent subject by placing its center near a crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  The flower in the upper, rightmost area of the frame was elected, and I used it as my focal point to help ensure its importance would be visually identifiable within the frame.  Here too, the high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Mullein Flower At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Museum Mullein: Part 2

 

Part 2 is a continuation of the Museum Mullein posts from the Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro mullein flower at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Hairy Stamen

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The new, larger mullein plant continued to grow during the time I created the image in the first post of this series.  In fact, it was likely seven feet tall when I composed my Hairy Stamen piece.  Just like the first plant, the second one also had flowers that bloomed.  Because I liked the artistic feel of the scene, I selected a subject that had a fuzzy stalk in the middleground.  Helping that decision was the fact that the flower itself was fresh and nice looking (i.e., it was clean and free of odd looking, dark colored substances that were on several other blooms).  I knew that the leaves and stalks had lots of hair on them, but I was surprised by how furry the flowers themselves were.  And, upon seeing the stamen at nearly two times life-size, I was intrigued with the amount and length of the hairs they had.  My artistic goal, from then on, was to ensure that they received the attention by using the center group of them as my focal point.  Though not completely in the zone of sharpness or nearly as hairy, I like how the lower stamens help provide balance.  The high level of detail allows tiny individual hairs to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Wet Flower At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Spiny

 

Macro abstract wet flower at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Spiny

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One of the things I like about the south is that flowers are still blooming in early fall.  Of course, it doesn’t feel much like fall during that time when the high temperatures remain in the upper 80’s.  As usual, the colors of the subject in my Spiny piece are what attracted me to it.  I found this flower in the front garden near the south wall of the Aiken County Historical Museum (i.e., next to where Newberry and New Lane streets meet) and it appeared to be fairly fresh.  It was also quite wet with morning dew.  All that water helps calm down the sharp spikes found across most of the flower’s surface.  For aesthetic reasons, I placed the center of the flower in the frame slightly to the left of center horizontally and nearly centered vertically.  The high level of detail allows individual dew drops as well as tiny hairs and spines to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Black Eyed Susan At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Curly Sue

 

Macro Black Eyed Susan at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Curly Sue

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I was experimenting with various ways of framing the foreground subject in my Curly Sue piece when I discovered an angle that allowed the background petals to bring additional visual interest to the scene.  I really liked the arcs of the petals in the background and how they came up into the left-hand side of the frame.  In fact, I felt that they gave the impression that this was one big black-eyed Susan flower with curled petals that were shooting out in all directions.  If not for the background stem being visible, it would certainly appear that way.  To perpetuate the illusion, I placed the center of the foreground flower just below the upper, rightmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds, and used that area as my focal point.  That aesthetic decision also tended to accentuate the relative size of the flower’s head.  The high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen and textures to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Wet Flower Center at Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Bubbling Yellow

 

Macro abstract wet flower center at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Bubbling Yellow

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There are some small bushes between the driveway and the east side of the building at the Aiken County Historical Museum.  I’ve inspected the nice little blooms they produce for a composition several times over the years, but wasn’t ever satisfied with what I was able to create.  My artistic goal was to fill the entire frame with the flower (something that is difficult to do because of their relatively diminutive size).  However, on the morning I created my Bubbling Yellow piece, I found a bush that had a flower on it that was just a bit bigger than what I’ve previously come across.  I placed the core of the flower slightly off center to that it could expand out and down toward the bottom of the frame.  I was thrilled with the wet surfaces and dew drops that add additional visual interest, and I love all the loops and arcs.

 

 

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Macro Flowers At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Potted

 

Macro flowers at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Potted

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The main reflecting pool (i.e., the largest one with the water fountains in it) in Hopeland Gardens has flowerpots at each corner of the rectangular shaped pond.  I’ve written a previous post about how the grounds keepers usually have some type of flowers or flora display in them, which is why I normally make my way to that area each time I’m on site searching for subjects.  The bright flowers in Potted caught my attention as I wound around one of the flowerpots.  My artistic goal was to fill the frame with as many flowers as I could while being close enough to capture the patterns in their throats and pollen swollen anthers.  Additionally, I wanted the background to be as dark as it could be so that the flowers would pop against it.  To find a suitable scene took a couple of passes around each of the flowerpots before returning to the one that initially caught my eye.  I then had to locate a group where the flowers were closely crowded together and experiment with various framings until I found one that I desired.  I focused on the stigma and anthers of the flower in the lower left-hand corner of the frame and got lucky that the distance to the camera’s sensor was nearly identical to the flower in the upper right-hand side.  Which allowed both of the flower’s throat areas to fall within the zone of sharpness.  The high level of detail allows texture and tiny hairs to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Gladiolus At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Hopeland Gardens Gladiolus

 

Sometimes you just have to give nature some help, which was the case the morning I composed the pieces in this post.  While surveying the area where I had found one years ago, I discovered two gladiolus plants next to each other that were lying flat on the ground.  They were both dead to the world and did not have the ability to stand on their own.  I have no idea what happened to them though an animal may have knocked them over, or perhaps it was the wind, or maybe their blossoms just got too heavy to hold up.  At any rate, it seemed like a real shame to have that much beauty going to waste.  One stalk was fairly tore up and the flowers were not in good shape at all, and the second had a couple of pretty decent looking blooms as well as others that were being overrun by ants.  I picked up the better of the two so that I could examine the flowers a bit closer.  After I felt that a composition existed, I tried to get it balanced or propped up high enough to where I could comfortably get my lens on it, but that didn’t work – it just fell right back down again.  So I got my plamp out and, after cleaning as many of the ants off from it as I could, I connected one of the clamps so that it would keep the plant from falling over.

 

 

Macro Gladiolus at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Reincarnated

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After effectively bringing the plant back to life, I searched for an artistically pleasing flower.  For my Reincarnated composition, I placed the center stalk of the stigma on the upper, leftmost one third line, using the rule of thirds.  Then while keeping the stigma at that location in the frame, I maneuvered the camera around to where the anthers had approximately the same amount of space to their respective side.  I focused on the stigma because it felt too prominent against the pink background to ignore.  The extremely shallow depth of field didn’t allow much else to fall into the zone of sharpness, and I wouldn’t argue too much against this being classified as naturally abstract.  However, the uniformity of the filaments, anthers, and stigma stalks (i.e., three, three, and three) helped convince me not to do that.  The high level of detail allows tiny hairs and texture to be seen.

 

 

Macro Gladiolus at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Stance

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While scouring the best remaining, ant-free blooms, I found one that I liked.  I decided to move the plamp into a position that would continue supporting the weight of the stalk and hold the flower steadier since the wind had started to pick up as the morning ticked away.  I focused at the top of the stigma here as well and that worked out pretty good considering the angle of the anthers.  I like how they slowly fade away.  I was also pleased with how the filaments blended right into the background of my Stance piece because it creates the illusion that the anthers are floating.  Tiny hairs and texture can be seen here too thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

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