Macro Abstract Dew Covered Rose Bud At The Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Wet Paint

 

Macro abstract dew covered rose bud at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Wet Paint

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I was initially attracted to the rose bud in my Wet Paint piece by the colors, which will not be a surprise to anyone who has been reading this blog for a while.  Those gorgeous oranges and reds were appealing from the entrance door all the way across the Rose Garden at the Rye Patch.  As I got closer to the subject, my artistic vision was to add to my Naturally Abstract gallery by focusing on a specific section of the bud.  One of the things that fascinates me about macro photography is how just being physically close to something while simultaneously using magnification can break it down into simple colors and lines.  In this case, to the point of not even being able to tell that it’s a flower.  I love that, and to achieve it, I composed this at two times life-size.  There was a bit of wind the morning I created this and, while I had a Plamp holding the bud, I lowered the F-stop to gain back a little shutter speed.  Doing that further reduced the already razor thin depth of field, but that also amplified the aesthetic effect I wanted.  The colors reminded me of paint, as if someone had pulled a brush across the frame, and the tiny dew drops that completely cover the surface provide a wet look.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Azalea Petal Edge Divides Colors At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Curtain

 

Macro abstract azalea petal edge divides colors at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Curtain

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With all of the azalea flowers on the north east side of the Aiken County Historical Museum, I was certain that I could find a worthy subject among them.  I used the edge of an azalea petal to create the naturally abstract composition in my Curtain piece.  My artistic vision was to split the image diagonally where one part featured the petal’s edge and the flower it belonged to while the other section is an entirely different azalea blossom.  That took quite a bit of exploring blooms and trying different angles until I found a flower that had the colors I wanted behind it with an edge that wasn’t burned, discolored, or chewed up.  Additionally, the edge had to be far enough away from the details in the center that they would dissolve into colors even at a high F-stop, which was required to keep most of edge sharply in focus.  Of course, composing at two times life-size helped because the depth of field is quite shallow.  Even with that, surface texture along the petal edge can be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Magnolia Petals Form Flame Shape In Aiken, SC

Magnolia Flame

 

Macro abstract magnolia petals form flame shape in Aiken, South Carolina
Magnolia Flame

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I was pulled over to the magnolia tree in a neighbor’s yard where I found the blossom in my Magnolia Flame piece by all of the flowers on the ground.  From a distance, it looked like there was a layer of pink surrounding the entire base of the tree.  I thought I might be able to create a naturally abstract composition from the flowers that had fallen off, but as I got closer it became clear that the remnants didn’t completely cover the grass and they were in fairly poor shape.  Not wanting to come home empty handed, I searched the branches for a new, better subject.  This particular bloom was fresh with excellent colors that drew me right in.  The shape that the petals formed immediately made me think of a flame (as if the fire from a candle was burning in a gorgeous pink tone).  Even though it was shot wide open with a very shallow depth of field, details including the surface texture and pollen can be seen.

 

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Macro Abstract Algae On Reflecting Pool Surface At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 2

Abstract Algae: Part 2

 

Part 2 is a continuation of the Abstract Algae blog posts.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Global

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My Global piece is all about the big bubble, and it is so much taller and larger than the previous bubbles that the extremely shallow depth of field isn’t deep enough to keep the bottom of it within the zone of sharpness.  That being said, one of my artistic goals was to ensure that the smaller bubble on the left-hand side stayed within the frame.  Fortunately, doing that placed the subject so that the rightmost one third line, using the rule of thirds, pretty much bisects it.  I also positioned it very close to being centered vertically.  The specific spot in the pool where this was composed was out in the more open area, and, as such, it benefitted from the blues in the sky reflecting off the surface.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Bubbles On Bubbles

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To increase the apparent depth of field for my Bubbles On Bubbles piece, it was focus stacked.  That allows thousands of tiny bubbles on the surface to be seen while keeping the larger bubbles within the zone of sharpness.  While not as bright as the tones in Global, this also had the advantage of picking up more of the blues from the reflection of the sky.  The shadows and particles that surround the bubbles remind me of how gravity pulls in nearby objects as planets form.  In fact, throughout the entire time during the composition of these works other bubbles on the surface of the pool (some of which I had planned to use as subjects) were growing, merging, and even popping as they floated around.

 

 

To see related pieces click here, for bonus images, see below.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Viscous

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Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Strange Brew

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Macro Abstract Algae On Reflecting Pool Surface At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 1

Abstract Algae: Part 1

 

I’ve written about the large reflecting pool in Hopeland Gardens in previous posts, and my regular readers may have surmised that there are others on the grounds.  In fact, there are four different pools.  Two of them are near the main pool and can be found on either side of it, while the other one is lower and south of the main pool.  The lower pool is long and not as wide, and it doesn’t have a fountain feature.  On the morning I composed the pieces in this series of posts, the lower pool was nearly completely covered with green algae.  Upon a closer examination of the surface, I discovered lots of bubbles and interesting naturally abstract scenes.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Frothy

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I was attracted by the bubbles and the random strands of algae in my Frothy piece.  Most of the surface has a chaotic – all over the place – feel which tends to cause areas with structure (i.e., the more defined, circular nature of the bubbles) to be highlighted.  I found it to be an interesting mixture of organization within disorder, and, as I’ve previously mentioned, I like dichotomous abstracts.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Greenie

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There is still a good bit of disarray on the surface of my Greenie piece, but with the focal point being on a larger/taller bubble combined with an extremely shallow depth of field, it quickly lost much of its detail.  One of my artistic goals was to keep the swoop to the left of the bubble within the frame.  I placed the bubble to where the leftmost one third line, using the rule of thirds, cuts through it a little to the right of center.  Though not centered vertically, both the upper and lower one third lines dissect the bubble as well.  I love discovering happy little aspects during post processing, and, in this case, the reflection on the bubble that resembles a smile (giving it a similar appearance to a smiley face) was an unexpected treat.

 

 

To see related pieces click here, for a bonus image, see below.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Formation

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Macro Gladiolus At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Hopeland Gardens Gladiolus

 

Sometimes you just have to give nature some help, which was the case the morning I composed the pieces in this post.  While surveying the area where I had found one years ago, I discovered two gladiolus plants next to each other that were lying flat on the ground.  They were both dead to the world and did not have the ability to stand on their own.  I have no idea what happened to them though an animal may have knocked them over, or perhaps it was the wind, or maybe their blossoms just got too heavy to hold up.  At any rate, it seemed like a real shame to have that much beauty going to waste.  One stalk was fairly tore up and the flowers were not in good shape at all, and the second had a couple of pretty decent looking blooms as well as others that were being overrun by ants.  I picked up the better of the two so that I could examine the flowers a bit closer.  After I felt that a composition existed, I tried to get it balanced or propped up high enough to where I could comfortably get my lens on it, but that didn’t work – it just fell right back down again.  So I got my plamp out and, after cleaning as many of the ants off from it as I could, I connected one of the clamps so that it would keep the plant from falling over.

 

 

Macro Gladiolus at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Reincarnated

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After effectively bringing the plant back to life, I searched for an artistically pleasing flower.  For my Reincarnated composition, I placed the center stalk of the stigma on the upper, leftmost one third line, using the rule of thirds.  Then while keeping the stigma at that location in the frame, I maneuvered the camera around to where the anthers had approximately the same amount of space to their respective side.  I focused on the stigma because it felt too prominent against the pink background to ignore.  The extremely shallow depth of field didn’t allow much else to fall into the zone of sharpness, and I wouldn’t argue too much against this being classified as naturally abstract.  However, the uniformity of the filaments, anthers, and stigma stalks (i.e., three, three, and three) helped convince me not to do that.  The high level of detail allows tiny hairs and texture to be seen.

 

 

Macro Gladiolus at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Stance

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While scouring the best remaining, ant-free blooms, I found one that I liked.  I decided to move the plamp into a position that would continue supporting the weight of the stalk and hold the flower steadier since the wind had started to pick up as the morning ticked away.  I focused at the top of the stigma here as well and that worked out pretty good considering the angle of the anthers.  I like how they slowly fade away.  I was also pleased with how the filaments blended right into the background of my Stance piece because it creates the illusion that the anthers are floating.  Tiny hairs and texture can be seen here too thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

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Macro Wandering Jew Petals Form Butterfly Wings At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Butterfly Wings

 

Macro Wandering Jew petals form butterfly wings at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Butterfly Wings

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I don’t normally see two wandering Jew flowers growing so close to one another.  In fact, this was the very first time I had ever seen a pair that had petals touching each other, and their proximity caused me to see a familiar pattern in my mind’s eye.  Taken as a whole, the outside petals on both sides appear to create the shape of butterfly wings.  I didn’t want the wings to feel centered in the frame, so I left a little more space above and on the right side of the petals.  That caused the flowers to be placed in the frame where the left flower’s core/center is very near the lower, leftmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  With the anthers scattered around in different groups as well as being considerably above the surface of the petals (especially considering the shallow depth of field), I selected the rope-like strands that grow out of the filaments as my focal point.  That aesthetic decision simultaneously forced the anthers to be out of focus and enhanced the surface of the petals including the pollen that had fallen on them.  The high level of detail allows texture, dew drops, and individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Daylilies At Edisto Memorial Gardens In Orangeburg, SC: Part 3

Orangeburg Daylilies: Part 3

 

Part 3 is a continuation of the Orangeburg Daylilies posts from the Edisto Memorial Gardens In Orangeburg, South Carolina.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 2, click here.

 

 

Macro Daylily at Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg, South Carolina
Peachy

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My Peachy composition allows you to look right down the throat of this pastel colored flower.  Being a color junkie, the pale pinks, oranges, and greens are not what I normally look for.  But, as I’ve previously posted, that’s a good thing.  Sometimes the more subdued colors are a nice change of pace (especially if they are different from what you usually see and even better if they are a departure from your typical palette).  You can think of it as expanding your horizons or simply trying something new.  For aesthetic reasons, I placed the anther farthest to the left on the upper, leftmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  I then focused on the larger foreground anther on the right side which created good sharpness across all of them.  Individual pieces of pollen on the anthers and filaments can be seen due to the high level of detail.

 

 

Macro Daylily at Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg, South Carolina
Pink Paradise

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Pink Paradise was composed looking right down the flower’s throat as well, but the colors are decidedly different from Peachy.  They are much more bold and saturated as well as satisfying to my color junkie needs.  The gorgeous pinks and reds are a nice complement to the bright yellows and greens, and one of my artistic goals was to feature them as much as possible.  To accomplish that desire, I found an angle that would allow those colors to fill the top of the frame while lifting the stamen up and off of the bottom.  I also wanted to hold the anthers near the yellows as their darker colors are naturally enhanced against the more vibrant tones.  While I used the first foreground anther as my focal point, the extremely shallow depth of field, when shooting at two times life-size, only allowed the zone of sharpness to extend just behind it to the middleground anthers.  Even so, the high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

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Macro abstract Daylily at Edisto Memorial Gardens in Orangeburg, South Carolina
Orange Curls

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I was attracted to the flower in my Orange Curls piece because it was so different from what a normal daylily looks like.  It was immediately apparent that any composition using this subject would produce an abstract.  Since it was the only one in the area, and I didn’t have anything else to compare it to, I can’t say if this particular type of flower usually grows in this manner.  Perhaps it was lacking something or deformed in some way.  Whatever the case, I loved all the loopy, wavy lines Mother Nature endowed it with.  The stigma has character as well and is bent and curled like it had been abused.  Though the anthers aren’t as easy to see because they have the same color as the petals, I did place one at the lower, rightmost crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  I then used that anther as my focal point.  The high level of detail allows tiny dew drops to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Heart Shaped Leaf At Hitchcock Woods In Aiken, SC

I Heart Nature

 

Macro heart shaped leaf at Hitchcock Woods in Aiken, South Carolina
I Heart Nature

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Hitchcock Woods is an amazing resource to have right in our city, and I’ve written about it in previous blog posts.  That being said, I don’t usually hunt for subjects within it using my macro rig.  But, this particular morning I didn’t have any luck finding something to point my camera at on the grounds of the Aiken County Historical Museum so I decided to hike down some of the horse trails to see what I could find.

The leaf in my I Heart Nature piece immediately drew me in primarily due to its shape.  After all, the heart symbol is a universal ideograph that represents love, and, being a nature lover, I had a strong desire to capture a scene expressing that sentiment.  I also found the greens quite attractive.  In fact, one of my artistic goals was to find an angle that allowed me to fill the background with as much green as possible while avoiding the creation of darker brown areas where the dirt on the ground could be seen behind/under the leaves.  Additional aesthetic concerns were leaf placement (both angle and position in the frame) as well as depth of field control.  I put the leaf in the sensor on a diagonal so that it wouldn’t feel static or centered even though I gave the subject about the same amount of breathing room on either side and kept the distance from the top of the frame nearly equal to the space at the bottom.  I sought as much detail as I could get in and on the leaf’s surface, but I also wanted the background to quickly fade away.  When there is sufficient distance from the subject to the background, depth of field can be increased while maintaining good bokeh, but when objects in the background are close to the subject, you have to compromise.  In this case, I had to open the lens incrementally until I found the right amount for this composition (i.e., where I was getting as much detail as possible from the subject while simultaneously decreasing features of the background leaves).  This is another time where your camera’s depth of field preview really pays off because you can use it to dial in the setting while you observe the effect across your work.  Even though I reduced the depth of field, the high level of captured detail allows surface texture to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Wet Spiderwort At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Wet Spiderwort

 

Macro wet Spiderwort at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Wet Spiderwort

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I was attracted to my Wet Spiderwort piece by how nicely the yellow anthers popped against the complementary blues.  But, as is often the case, upon viewing the scene at nearly two times life-size, I discovered something even more enticing.  I loved how the water drops had formed in and around the anthers and stigma.  By dialing back the already shallow depth of field, I could have reduced the detail in the background, however, my desire to hold a selection of anthers and the water drops sharply in focus outweighed any other aesthetic priorities.  Further, I like how the drops on the petals add to the overall soaked feel.  To place them in an artistically pleasing location within the frame, the largest drops in the group of anthers were concentrated near the left most, bottom crossing line, using the rule of thirds, and they all touch (or are split by) one of the horizontal or vertical grid lines.  The high level of captured detail allows textures and drop reflections to be seen.

 

 

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