Macro Fall Pansy At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Dew Point

 

Macro Pansy at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Dew Point

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I just realized, as I was writing this, that I ended the season at the exact same place I started with an identical type of flower.  Patsy’s Garden in the Rye Patch Rose Garden had been recently replanted with pansies.  Artistically pleasing specimens were fairly sparse, but this one stood out.  I liked the colors (of course), but the tiny dew drops made the difference.  The petal surfaces are nearly completely covered resulting in a sparkling effect.  Aesthetically, I placed the green heart in the center of the flower just below the bottom one third line, using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.  The high level of detail allows surface texture, individual dew drops, and individual pollen pieces to be seen.

 

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Macro Berries And Fall Leaves At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Fall Berries

 

Macro berries and fall leaves at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Fall Berries

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The leaves on the tree where my Fall Berries piece was created can be quite colorful in the Fall.  They were, as they have been in the past, loud enough to call me over from across the lawn at the Rye Patch.  I searched around the tree for artistically pleasing scenes.  I wanted good colors in the leaves and at least one berry.  For the scene I settled on, I liked how the dark colors of the berries contrasted nicely against the brighter leaves as well as their mixture of purples with the blue reflections.  Aesthetically, I found a perspective that kept the berries from touching each other.  Then I placed the left most berry on the first lower left crossing line (a little off center), using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.

 

I normally try to get as much depth of field as I possibly can, but sometimes I have to dial back the F-stop setting.  As I’ve posted about previously, photography is about concession management.  The wind picked up just as I began exploring the leaves.  With the sun not yet able to provide much light through the surrounding trees, I needed several seconds of exposure time.  But, Mother Nature insisted on rustling the leaves with a breeze coming on shorter intervals than what I required.  To come to an equitable agreement with her, I dropped my F-stop down to F/11 which cut my exposure time down to two seconds.  Voila, everybody was happy.  And, as a bonus, the background leaves nearly completely dissolved down into simple colors.  Even with a shallow depth of field, the high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

 

 

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Macro Abstract Fall Leaf At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Closing In

 

Macro abstract leaf changing to Fall colors at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Closing In

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I liked the naturally abstract pattern on the leaf in my Closing In piece.  I discovered it in the same swampy area of Hopeland Gardens that several other leaf compositions came from.  In addition to the pigment pattern painted across its surface, I felt that it was a poignant depiction of the end of a life cycle.  Very little of the original, healthy green of the leaf exists.  Nearly all of it has been replaced by stages of dying and death.  The yellows are the beginning of the end with the colorful oranges and reds of decay following close behind.  The browns are next in the timeline and then finally black (colorless and lifeless).  The green areas are trying to hold out, to continue providing their contribution to the sustainment of life, but they are losing and there is no hope of recovery.  The inevitability is inescapable.  The leaf will become nourishment for any number of other organisms and it provides a visual treat by presenting gorgeous colors on its way out.  As if Mother Nature wanted us to see that even death has positive attributes.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

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Macro Flower At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Fall Blooms

 

Macro flower at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Fall Blooms

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Though Fall was only a week old, the flowers near the subject in my Fall Blooms piece were burned, wilted, dying, and/or just generally nasty.  In fact, I initially walked right past them on my way to the rear of the Aiken County Historical Museum, and it wasn’t until I made my way back toward the car that I spotted this subject.  I was surprised by how well this late bloomer was holding up and was impressed with its size (it was a bit larger than its neighbors).  I loved the colors.  Normally I see solid petal colors so having pink with white was unusual.  The interior blooms, with their brilliant oranges and yellows, were also quite attractive.  In fact, I used their five, furry, pollen coated arms as my focal point.  That aesthetic choice gave just enough sharpness to create the cool looking abstract pattern in the very center of the flower.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs and individual pollen pieces to be seen.

 

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Macro Abstract Puff Ball At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Puffed

 

Macro abstract puff ball mushroom surface at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Puffed

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The cool looking design in my Puffed piece is the surface of a puffball mushroom at two times life-size.  I found it near the butterfly bush on the backside of the Aiken County Historical Museum.  I have to admit that curiosity, more than anything else, attracted me to the subject.  I simply wondered what the surface looked like and, after having put the lens on it, discovered that a neat abstract pattern existed.  It’s covered in tiny little groups of fibers that look like hair mountains with gaps between them that create the zigzag channels.  The hair mountains have brown caps that appear to be singed like someone took a hot flame or a blow torch and ran it across the entire area causing them to melt and coalesce.

 

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Macro Velvet Sage At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Velvet Sage

 

Macro Velvet Sage at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Fuzzy Was He

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The furry little purple pods in my Fuzzy Was He piece attracted me to this spot of the big back garden at the Aiken County Historical Museum.  The bottom portion of the velvet sage looked like a rather large circular weed which wasn’t very photogenic, but the hairy stalks that carried the tips above that area certainly were.  The sharper pointed tips contrasted nicely with the softer round edges on the stem, and the dew drops added a bit more visual interest.  I liked the curve of the stem and placed it in the frame so that some of the background stems would add additional patches of color.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs and variously sized dew drops (some of which look like little bubbles) to be seen.

 

 

Macro Velvet Sage at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Velvet Dew

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The stem in my Velvet Dew composition was out away from other stems.  Which was good because it was also in a position that allowed me to isolate it against a colorful background of flowers.  To achieve additional sharpness across the entire length of the stem, it was focus stacked.  Focus stacking involves creating multiple images where the focal points allow overlapping zones of sharpness.  The images are then combined using special software that understands where the sharpest areas in each image are located.  Incredible details are possible using the technique, but it isn’t easy and requires conditions that are difficult (for my compositional style) to find in the field.

 

Artistically, I wanted the furry bloom at the bottom in the frame, as much color from the background flowers as possible, and, as previously mentioned, sharpness on the stem in each section.  The focus stacking and high level of detail permits individual hairs and individual dew drops to be seen from top to bottom and end to end of the stem.

 

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Macro fall colored leaf at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina

Blown In

Blown In

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Though Fall was just a week old, the colorful leaf in my Blown In piece was a clear indicator that more color would soon be on its way.  In fact, those colors stopped me dead in my tracks as I was walking up the sidewalk on the east side of the Rye Patch.  The leaf contrasted nicely against the darker leaves on the small bushes that line that side of the building.  It’s fair to say that it was conspicuous, though I wasn’t sure where it came from, and I didn’t see any other leaves with that much color (even after scanning the nearby trees).  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

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Maple Leaf On Rose Petals At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Maple Rose

Macro Maple leaf on Rose petals at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Maple Rose

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I found this little scene next to the chimney on the side of the Dollhouse.  The chimney was being repaired due to some type of damage that it had sustained.  While I composed Maple Rose, the petals and parts continued to fall away from their flowers.  There was a fairly large area on the ground completely covered by the castoff pieces.  Being a confessed color-junkie, I was thrilled to discover such a colorful and complementary combination of nature preparing for winter.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

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Fallen Leaves At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Fallen Leaves

Fallen leaves at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Ground Cover

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The pine leaves in my Ground Cover piece form a simple fall scene at Hopeland Gardens.  Coming upon the mostly green leaf interwoven among the brown leaves that had fallen off the nearby trees and completely covered the ground with a natural mulch, I immediately felt that it had the ability to depict one of nature’s most familiar axioms – the circle of life.  As evidenced by its color, the green leaf likely still had some life available and very well may have been able to contribute to the overall health of the tree it came from.  Yet there it laid, discarded, as if it was just as dried up and dead as the leaves surrounding it.  After providing photosynthesis and having served its purpose, even if prematurely castoff, the leaf continues to be of value to its ecosystem.  Even in death it will provide shelter and eventually become nourishment for other local life so that they can live, grow, and keep the cycle going.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

Leaves on ground at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Fallen

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I created Fallen a short distance from the spot where Ground Cover was composed.  While this fall scene is a bit more chaotic, it also has more colors.  I like how the light coming through the red leaves gives the pine leaves beneath them a boost in their reds thereby making them appear much more orange than the leaves without that influence.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen here as well.

 

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Macro Pansy At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Inflamed

Macro Pansy at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Inflamed

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As an admitted color-junkie, you know that I was loving the colors of the pansy in my Inflamed piece.  They are loud and bold, and the reds and yellows immediately reminded me of fire and flames.  The yellows seem to be exploding out and away from the center.  This intense little flower was discovered in the gazebo area known as Patsy’s Garden that sits between the two sides of the Rye Patch Rose Garden.  While there is usually plenty of color to be found in the fall, I certainly didn’t expect to find a healthy and vibrant flower displaying that much.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and individual hairs to be seen.

 

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