Macro Fall Pansy At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Dew Point

 

Macro Pansy at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Dew Point

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I just realized, as I was writing this, that I ended the season at the exact same place I started with an identical type of flower.  Patsy’s Garden in the Rye Patch Rose Garden had been recently replanted with pansies.  Artistically pleasing specimens were fairly sparse, but this one stood out.  I liked the colors (of course), but the tiny dew drops made the difference.  The petal surfaces are nearly completely covered resulting in a sparkling effect.  Aesthetically, I placed the green heart in the center of the flower just below the bottom one third line, using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.  The high level of detail allows surface texture, individual dew drops, and individual pollen pieces to be seen.

 

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Macro Flower At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Fall Blooms

 

Macro flower at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Fall Blooms

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Though Fall was only a week old, the flowers near the subject in my Fall Blooms piece were burned, wilted, dying, and/or just generally nasty.  In fact, I initially walked right past them on my way to the rear of the Aiken County Historical Museum, and it wasn’t until I made my way back toward the car that I spotted this subject.  I was surprised by how well this late bloomer was holding up and was impressed with its size (it was a bit larger than its neighbors).  I loved the colors.  Normally I see solid petal colors so having pink with white was unusual.  The interior blooms, with their brilliant oranges and yellows, were also quite attractive.  In fact, I used their five, furry, pollen coated arms as my focal point.  That aesthetic choice gave just enough sharpness to create the cool looking abstract pattern in the very center of the flower.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs and individual pollen pieces to be seen.

 

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Wandering Jew At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Wandering Through Green

 

Wandering Jew surrounded by green leaves at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Wandering Through Green

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I found this wandering Jew nestled between the gorgeous green leaves on the north side of the circular driveway at the Aiken County Historical Museum.  I searched for a section that wasn’t too ate up, had an artistically pleasing pattern, and the ability to fill as much of the frame as possible with leaves.  I then placed the flower of the wandering Jew on the top left most crossing line, using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.  I really liked how the dark purple and green complement each other and create an attractive scene.  I think the gardener that planted this section also believed that the two colors would work well with each other.  The high level of detail allows surface texture, individual hairs, and individual dew drops to be seen.

 

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Macro Abstract Hibiscus Leaf At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Meal Design

 

Macro abstract partially consumed Hibiscus leaf at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Meal Design

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My Meal Design piece consists of three basic components: a hibiscus leaf, sepal, and petal.  I loved the design cut into the yellow leaf likely by some type of insect that had eaten it.  I placed it in the frame so that the midrib would run diagonally while filling the bug holes with the colors of the petal behind it.  With a bit of aesthetic luck, the ribs of the background petal were also running up the frame on diagonal lines.  I couldn’t do much with the green sepal as it was connected to the petal, but I felt that it was fine adding just a touch of additional color to the lower corner.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and individual fibers to be seen.

 

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Macro Periwinkle At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC: Part 2

Periwinkle: Part 2

Part 2 is a continuation of the Periwinkle posts from the Aiken County Historical Museum.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro Periwinkle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Star Light

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The flower in my Star Light piece was fairly large compared to the periwinkle I normally see.  In fact, that is what caused me to stop and look at it more closely.  And, I’m glad I did.  I loved the little wheel looking object in the very center of the flower and the ample amount of yellow encircling it.  I also liked how the white was shooting away from the center (i.e., beams of varying lengths that fade in intensity as they travel farther from the center) as if it was some type of light rays.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

 

Macro Periwinkle at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Pink Pair

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I discovered the group of periwinkle in my Pink Pair just off the sidewalk as I was headed toward the patio area.  I found them attractive because they were fresh and pretty.  I loved the subtle pink tones in their petals and their gorgeous centers.  I placed the right side flower’s center on the right most crossing line, using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.  Luckily both flower centers were nearly the same distance from the camera sensor which meant that the left side fell squarely into the zone of sharpness.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs to be seen.

 

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Macro Abstract Canna Lily At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC: Part 2

Abstract Canna Lilies: Part 2

Part 2 is a continuation of the Abstract Canna Lilies posts from the same plant group in the big back garden at the Aiken County Historical Museum.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract Canna Lily at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Undulating

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I was called over to the lily in my Undulating composition by its bold colors.  In fact, this flower had the most attractive colors out of any I had seen blooming from this group all season.  But, I was even more impressed with the pattern they created.  I loved how the petals felt like waves rolling away from and crashing back into the center.  The high level of detail allows individual dew drops and surface texture to be seen.

 

 

Macro abstract Canna Lily at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Inner Smile

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Inner Smile is essentially the vertical companion to Undulating.  Though the pattern the colors form is the same, it does have a different feel when viewed vertically.  Thanks to the high level of detail, individual dew drops and surface texture can be seen here as well.

 

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Black Eyed Susan Flowers At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Black Eyes

 

Black Eyed Susan flowers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Black Eyes

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Regular readers may recall my posts on using busy backgrounds and how I normally avoid them.  My Black Eyes piece is yet another example of where I wanted an at least somewhat busier background.  I specifically placed the flowers in the foreground so that they would be a bit lower in the frame allowing another group of flowers several feet behind them to fill up the background.  The background flowers have almost been dissolved into simple colors, but they retain just enough shape to tell that they are the same variety as those in the foreground.  My artistic goal for this was to capture a simple, pretty scene in the big back garden at the Aiken County Historical Museum.

 

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Macro Tree Flowers At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Tree Flowers

 

Macro tree flower at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Stigma Star

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White blossoms on a small tree called to me from across the Rye Patch lawn.  I’ve never seen a bloom like these in that area before, but I don’t think that it has been planted there for very long.  In fact, the tree itself was only a couple of feet taller than I am.  The honey bees just loved the flowers and were all over them.  After more closely examining one, I loved the star shaped stigma surrounded by the bright orange and yellow anthers and filaments.  For my Stigma Star composition, I utilized the stigma as my focal point and placed it on the right most line using the rule of thirds (just a little off center).  I wanted to keep as many of the anthers in the frame as possible so the lens was moved slightly right to accommodate that aesthetic desire.  The high level of detail allows surface textures on the stigma and anthers to be seen.

 

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Macro tree flowers at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Tree Flowers

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After successfully creating a macro version of one of the flowers, I wanted my Tree Flowers composition to show them blooming on the tree.  I had to fight a bit more wind to get it, but luckily there was enough light to where I could keep my shutter speed under a second while maintaining a decent depth of field setting.  Interestingly, it appears that only one of the flower’s petals has a fuzzy/furry edge.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs (around a petal edge) and surface textures to be seen.

 

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Rose Of Sharon Flower And Bud At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Standout

 

Rose Of Sharon flower and bud at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Standout

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I believe that the blossom in my Standout piece is rose of Sharon.  When facing west, this tree is to the right of the purple rose of Sharon (the same one that produced the bud in front of a bloom from a previous post) next to the wall in the Aiken County Historical Museum.  I’ve noticed that they have comparable blooming schedules and their flowers have similar designs.  This bloom was positioned by itself with lots of space around it and, more importantly, behind it (the background was clean all the way across Laurens Street to the trees on the other side).  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

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Macro Rose Of Sharon At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Snowballs

 

Macro Rose Of Sharon at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Snowballs

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Having great colors is almost an automatic way to get my attention, but occasionally I’m attracted to a given blossom by how easy I believe it should be to work with.  That was the case with the subject in my Snowballs piece.  This is on the same little bush at the Aiken County Historical Museum that I created an abstract from in a previous post and it offered several potential subject blooms.  I loved the blood red colors and the design formed as the reds go from purples to pinks as they flow away from the flower’s center.  I placed the snow white stigma discs on the lower crossing line, using the rule of thirds, and used them as my focal point.

 

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