Macro Flowers At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Macro Flowers

 

Macro liriope at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Liriope

To purchase a print of Liriope click here
To view a larger version of Liriope click here

I liked the design and colors of the flower in my Liriope piece.  I used red flowers for the background and opened up the lens just enough to create a nice bokeh while maintaining as much subject detail as possible.  As I have written in previous posts, having a Live View capability that can be paired with the Depth Of Field Preview is quite useful in these situations.  Those functions allow you to see how the F-stop changes will affect your image thereby giving you an ability to dial in exactly what your artistic intent is.

 

 

Macro flower at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Up Close

To purchase a print of Up Close click here
To view a larger version of Up Close click here

The flower in my Up Close piece is the same type that was used for the background in the composition above.  I searched through and around the entire bush to find a subject that would give me what I envisioned.  Well, technically, I examined two bushes before settling on this particular bloom.  My artistic intent was to exclude any greens from background leaves while placing the center of the small flower in the upper portion of the frame.  To do this, I had to utilize my Frankenstein lens configuration.  Even though this was composed at less than two times life size magnification, the key was being able to get physically closer to the flower because that allowed me to only include what I wanted.  Surface textures can be seen here thanks to the high level of detail.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here.

Abstract Macros At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC: Part 1

Museum Abstracts: Part 1

 

Abstract macro coneflower center at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Stormy

To purchase a print of Stormy click here
To view a larger version of Stormy click here

My Stormy piece would not have been possible without the use of the Frankenstein lens I wrote about in a previous post.  It allowed me to get physically closer to the coneflower and really zoom into the center of the flower (e.g., this is close to three times life-size magnification).  It also required an enormous amount of shutter time (10 seconds) due to light loss (i.e., the extender, time of day, and cloud cover) and a higher F-stop.  I loved the naturally abstract design and the colors.  Individual pieces of pollen and tiny hairs can be seen.

 

 

Abstract macro flower center at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Indian Blanket

To purchase a print of Indian Blanket click here
To view a larger version of Indian Blanket click here

The magnification level used for my Indian Blanket piece was more than two times life-size.  And, once again, I could not have composed this without the Frankenstein lens.  I liked the randomness of the hairs in this naturally abstract scene (almost like someone scribbled them in).  For aesthetic purposes, I framed it so that some additional reds were added to the corners.  Tiny dew drops and individual hairs are visible as well.

 

 

Abstract macro spiked leaf at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Flame Spike

To purchase a print of Flame Spike click here
To view a larger version of Flame Spike click here

I loved how the tip of the leaf in my Flame Spike piece almost glowed as if it was being lit from the inside.  This is the very tip of one of the leaves from the same plant where I found a fallen berry that been stabbed earlier during the year.  Of course, this is nearly at three times life-size magnification and wouldn’t have been possible without the Frankenstein lens.  To amplify the brightness of the subject, I used an angle that looked into an area of the background that was in heavy shadow.  I loved the colors and how Mother Nature is basically screaming at anyone looking at it to keep their distance.  Individual pieces of pollen can be seen along the edges of the leaf.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here

Floral Macros At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Museum Floral Macros

 

Macro daylily anthers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Daylily Anthers

To purchase a print of Daylily Anthers click here
To view a larger version of Daylily Anthers click here

My Daylily Anthers piece was composed at two times life-size magnification.  In addition to the artistic satisfaction factor, I created it to establish what could be called a baseline.  That is, what my normal rig is capable of producing.  I recently purchased a Canon 500D Close-up Lens that can be added to my current rig to get close to three times life-size magnification.  Being at that level crosses over into an area known as extreme macro.  It creates a bit of a Frankenstein lens, but it was less expensive than going to something like an MP-E 65, and my hope was that I could sort of get my feet wet in extreme macro while using something that I was fairly comfortable with.  More from my Frankenstein lens to come…

 

 

Macro daylily stamens at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Stamen Pair

To purchase a print of Stamen Pair click here
To view a larger version of Stamen Pair click here

Stamen Pair was composed with my Frankenstein lens and has a magnification that is more than two times life-size.  With more magnification, the depth of field, which was already razor thin, is reduced even further.  That makes for a wonderful background.  Though the zone of sharpness is really shallow, individual pieces of pollen can still be seen.

 

 

Macro periwinkle shooting star at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Rising Star

To purchase a print of Rising Star click here
To view a larger version of Rising Star click here

My Rising Star piece was also composed with the Frankenstein lens.  In my mind’s eye, I immediately saw a star shape on the flower that appeared to be ascending.  I placed the center of the periwinkle where the top one third line (using the rule of thirds) cuts through it so that the star itself would be higher in the frame.  Tiny drops of water and individual hairs can be seen.

 

 

To see related pieces, click here