Macro Pansy With Sunburst Pattern At The Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Sunburst

 

Macro pansy with sunburst pattern at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Sunburst

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I’ve created lots of pansy artwork over the years with many of them coming from Patsy’s Garden at the Rye Patch.  Maybe she loved them and their wonderful designs as much as I do.  Who knows, she may have even agreed with my “Pansies Rock” mantra.  Longtime readers of this blog are familiar with her special, memorial area within the Rose Garden, but for those of you who aren’t, my Patsy’s blog tag is a good place to learn more about it.  I was attracted to the flower in my Sunburst piece by the pattern of purples that are streaming out and away from the center of it combined with the yellow and orange tones.  As I usually do when framing these little flowers, I placed the green heart in the core so that a one third line, using the rule of thirds, crossed it.  The high level of captured detail allows lots of tiny dew drops and pollen to be seen.

 

 

 

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Macro Iris Crest, Falls, And Beard At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Gold Crest

 

Macro iris crest, falls, and beard at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Gold Crest

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While exploring the big, back garden at the Aiken County Historical Museum on a late spring morning, I came across the iris in my Gold Crest piece.  It was immediately attractive because I don’t recall seeing a yellow one previously (at the museum or anywhere else for that matter).  More than that though, I found the flame shapes on the crest especially appealing.  I also felt that the lines on the falls had an abstract quality that was enhanced by the beard.  My artistic vision was to frame the composition so that all of those factors were represented, and, because they were so cool, I used the flames as the focal point.  I didn’t specifically utilize any rule of thirds lines while forming an aesthetically pleasing design, yet the flames are within the top one third while the beard and falls start very close to the bottom one third line.  More often than not, I find that my recent placement choices innately gravitate towards those ratios.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Azalea Petal Edge Divides Colors At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Curtain

 

Macro abstract azalea petal edge divides colors at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Curtain

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With all of the azalea flowers on the north east side of the Aiken County Historical Museum, I was certain that I could find a worthy subject among them.  I used the edge of an azalea petal to create the naturally abstract composition in my Curtain piece.  My artistic vision was to split the image diagonally where one part featured the petal’s edge and the flower it belonged to while the other section is an entirely different azalea blossom.  That took quite a bit of exploring blooms and trying different angles until I found a flower that had the colors I wanted behind it with an edge that wasn’t burned, discolored, or chewed up.  Additionally, the edge had to be far enough away from the details in the center that they would dissolve into colors even at a high F-stop, which was required to keep most of edge sharply in focus.  Of course, composing at two times life-size helped because the depth of field is quite shallow.  Even with that, surface texture along the petal edge can be seen.

 

 

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Macro Fall Flowers At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Fall Flowers

 

Given that it was already November, I wasn’t expecting to see much color from new blooms at the Aiken County Historical Museum (or anywhere, for that matter).  So, I was pleasantly surprised when I spotted some as I was driving in.  The flowers in this post were just off the driveway in front of the building.  In fact, I was kneeling on the driveway, and I had the tripod on the pavement while composing them.

 

 

Macro Fall flowers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Autumn Bunch

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My artistic goal for Autumn Branch was to fill the frame with as much of the flower’s gorgeous colors as I could.  First, I searched through the various groups of flowers with just my eyes, and then where I felt possible compositions existed, I looked through those clusters with the lens.  While I wasn’t quite able to completely fill the entire frame, I did come close.  Having a viewfinder with 100% coverage helps in situations like this because you know what you are seeing is what you will get and no cropping will be needed in post.  I placed the focal point on the leftmost flower and had enough depth in the zone of sharpness to sharply capture petals and pollen on flowers that were behind it.  The high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

Macro Fall flowers at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
November Highlights

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The morning sun was providing side lighting for my November Highlights piece, which caused the yellows to almost glow.  One of my artistic goals was identical to those I had for Autumn Bunch in that I wanted to fill the entire frame with flowers.  While I searched for a collection of flowers that met that desire, I also wanted to create a prominent subject by placing its center near a crossing line, using the rule of thirds.  The flower in the upper, rightmost area of the frame was elected, and I used it as my focal point to help ensure its importance would be visually identifiable within the frame.  Here too, the high level of detail allows individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Mullein Flower At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Museum Mullein: Part 2

 

Part 2 is a continuation of the Museum Mullein posts from the Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro mullein flower at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Hairy Stamen

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The new, larger mullein plant continued to grow during the time I created the image in the first post of this series.  In fact, it was likely seven feet tall when I composed my Hairy Stamen piece.  Just like the first plant, the second one also had flowers that bloomed.  Because I liked the artistic feel of the scene, I selected a subject that had a fuzzy stalk in the middleground.  Helping that decision was the fact that the flower itself was fresh and nice looking (i.e., it was clean and free of odd looking, dark colored substances that were on several other blooms).  I knew that the leaves and stalks had lots of hair on them, but I was surprised by how furry the flowers themselves were.  And, upon seeing the stamen at nearly two times life-size, I was intrigued with the amount and length of the hairs they had.  My artistic goal, from then on, was to ensure that they received the attention by using the center group of them as my focal point.  Though not completely in the zone of sharpness or nearly as hairy, I like how the lower stamens help provide balance.  The high level of detail allows tiny individual hairs to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Wet Flower At Aiken County Historical Museum In Aiken, SC

Spiny

 

Macro abstract wet flower at Aiken County Historical Museum in Aiken, South Carolina
Spiny

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One of the things I like about the south is that flowers are still blooming in early fall.  Of course, it doesn’t feel much like fall during that time when the high temperatures remain in the upper 80’s.  As usual, the colors of the subject in my Spiny piece are what attracted me to it.  I found this flower in the front garden near the south wall of the Aiken County Historical Museum (i.e., next to where Newberry and New Lane streets meet) and it appeared to be fairly fresh.  It was also quite wet with morning dew.  All that water helps calm down the sharp spikes found across most of the flower’s surface.  For aesthetic reasons, I placed the center of the flower in the frame slightly to the left of center horizontally and nearly centered vertically.  The high level of detail allows individual dew drops as well as tiny hairs and spines to be seen.

 

 

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Macro Leopard Frog In Duckweed At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Fountain Leopard

 

I’ve previously written and posted about the inoperative fountain system in Hopeland Gardens as well as being an opportunistic wildlife photographer.  All of the compositions in this post come from the upper fountain area and feature the same subject – a leopard frog that apparently wanted me to create works of it.  I was amazed that the frog let me get so close to it because normally they are very cautious and jump before you even get to see them.  I did move as slow as I could and continued to work my way up to these poses, but it almost felt like the frog simply wasn’t scared of me (for some unknown reason) and had no intention of fleeing no matter where I placed my tripod.  I did have a similar encounter with a young alligator once down at Magnolia Springs State Park near Millen, GA, but it has been my experience that sessions like that are extremely rare.

 

 

Macro directly above Leopard Frog in Duckweed at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Primed

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I was able to maneuver the tripod into a position where I was directly above the leopard frog for my Primed piece.  If it knew how nervous I was that it would jump, it very well may have.  I felt that this was a unique opportunity (if for no other reason than you just can’t ordinarily get this pose with a live subject without having used some type of unethical technique).  I was also thinking that its leg muscles must be locked and loaded and ready to fire in the blink of an eye.  I loved the green, elliptical patches mixed in with the rest of its body camouflage, and the duckweed roots draped across its body.  Due to the vertical orientation, I made the aesthetic choice of placing it very near the center of the frame horizontally.  The high level of detail allows textures to be seen.

 

 

Macro Leopard Frog in Duckweed at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Lounging Leopard

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By the time I had composed Lounging Leopard I was feeling pretty confident that this frog was going to let me create anything I wanted.  I had been deliberate and was careful when lifting and setting the legs of my tripod down both on the cement walls of the fountain and especially in the water near the frog.  One thing I did that may have helped was to pull the tripod up and away from the area when major leg adjustments were needed.  I had to use my experience and estimate the angles, height, and required leg positions for the next composition.  Having a ball head makes that a little bit easier because if you don’t quite get the legs into a good configuration you have some additional movement available by changing the orientation of your camera.  Aesthetically, I got as close to the water as I could so that I was nearly at eye-level to the frog.  Putting the perspective at your subject’s level helps bring them into a more intimate setting.  Keeping in mind that it is also important to give your subject some space to look into within the boundaries of the frame, I placed the eye so that it was nearly bisected by the leftmost one third line, using the rule of thirds.  And vertically, the eye is just below the upper, leftmost crossing line.  As with any wildlife subject, the focal point was put on the eye, which has a reflection off from its surface consisting of a little bit of sky and some trees that surround the fountain.  Once again, the high level of detail allows textures to be seen.

 

 

Macro head of Leopard Frog in Duckweed at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Leopard Head

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I got in as close as I could for my Leopard Head piece.  Having a longer lens certainly helps in a situation like this because you can create a full frame image without cropping or chasing your subject off due to the proximity of the lens.  At this distance, tiny details in the eye and on the skin are revealed.  For example, I love how the pigment in the skin has a type of sparkle in some areas.  Texture can be seen here as well (e.g., bumps on the outside of the eye socket and raised areas just behind the eyes) thanks to the high level of captured detail.

 

 

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Macro Abstract Algae On Reflecting Pool Surface At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 2

Abstract Algae: Part 2

 

Part 2 is a continuation of the Abstract Algae blog posts.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 1, click here.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Global

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My Global piece is all about the big bubble, and it is so much taller and larger than the previous bubbles that the extremely shallow depth of field isn’t deep enough to keep the bottom of it within the zone of sharpness.  That being said, one of my artistic goals was to ensure that the smaller bubble on the left-hand side stayed within the frame.  Fortunately, doing that placed the subject so that the rightmost one third line, using the rule of thirds, pretty much bisects it.  I also positioned it very close to being centered vertically.  The specific spot in the pool where this was composed was out in the more open area, and, as such, it benefitted from the blues in the sky reflecting off the surface.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Bubbles On Bubbles

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To increase the apparent depth of field for my Bubbles On Bubbles piece, it was focus stacked.  That allows thousands of tiny bubbles on the surface to be seen while keeping the larger bubbles within the zone of sharpness.  While not as bright as the tones in Global, this also had the advantage of picking up more of the blues from the reflection of the sky.  The shadows and particles that surround the bubbles remind me of how gravity pulls in nearby objects as planets form.  In fact, throughout the entire time during the composition of these works other bubbles on the surface of the pool (some of which I had planned to use as subjects) were growing, merging, and even popping as they floated around.

 

 

To see related pieces click here, for bonus images, see below.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Viscous

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Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Strange Brew

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Macro Abstract Algae On Reflecting Pool Surface At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC: Part 1

Abstract Algae: Part 1

 

I’ve written about the large reflecting pool in Hopeland Gardens in previous posts, and my regular readers may have surmised that there are others on the grounds.  In fact, there are four different pools.  Two of them are near the main pool and can be found on either side of it, while the other one is lower and south of the main pool.  The lower pool is long and not as wide, and it doesn’t have a fountain feature.  On the morning I composed the pieces in this series of posts, the lower pool was nearly completely covered with green algae.  Upon a closer examination of the surface, I discovered lots of bubbles and interesting naturally abstract scenes.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Frothy

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I was attracted by the bubbles and the random strands of algae in my Frothy piece.  Most of the surface has a chaotic – all over the place – feel which tends to cause areas with structure (i.e., the more defined, circular nature of the bubbles) to be highlighted.  I found it to be an interesting mixture of organization within disorder, and, as I’ve previously mentioned, I like dichotomous abstracts.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Greenie

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There is still a good bit of disarray on the surface of my Greenie piece, but with the focal point being on a larger/taller bubble combined with an extremely shallow depth of field, it quickly lost much of its detail.  One of my artistic goals was to keep the swoop to the left of the bubble within the frame.  I placed the bubble to where the leftmost one third line, using the rule of thirds, cuts through it a little to the right of center.  Though not centered vertically, both the upper and lower one third lines dissect the bubble as well.  I love discovering happy little aspects during post processing, and, in this case, the reflection on the bubble that resembles a smile (giving it a similar appearance to a smiley face) was an unexpected treat.

 

 

To see related pieces click here, for a bonus image, see below.

 

 

Macro abstract algae on reflecting pool surface at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Formation

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Macro Abstract Pattern Of Decay On Leaf At Hopeland Gardens In Aiken, SC

Cessation

 

Macro abstract pattern of decay on leaf at Hopeland Gardens in Aiken, South Carolina
Cessation

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The big leaves in the swampy area at Hopeland Gardens make wonderful subjects in the fall when their colors start to change.  I have written about and posted several examples over the years because I love the patterns that can be found as they begin to expire (e.g., Fire Veins, Lava Leaf, and Closing In).  When they are backlit by the golden tones of a morning sun, as the leaf in my Cessation piece is, they are able to elevate my excitement to another level.  As I scan their locale looking for subjects to investigate from the trail at the top of the berm between the swamp and the pond, backlit leaves with these colors act like a beacon that my eyes immediately lock on to.  At that point, there is a limited amount of time available to create a composition.  The window is short lived due to the fact that the sun has to rise above the trees that keep the swamp partially shaded, and by the time it does, there is very little golden light remaining.  I loved the last vestiges of Chlorophyll in the green pockets and tracing around the outline of the yellows and oranges, and I was captivated by the thought that Mother Nature will paint a different pattern on every leaf that reaches this stage of life.  This leaf is very likely the only one that will ever look exactly as it does.  The high level of detail allows texture and tiny leaf veins to be seen.

 

 

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