Edisto Beach Trip: Day 2 – Grove Plantation Abstracts

Day 2, Grove Plantation Abstracts

After lunch, we drove over to The Grove Plantation.  The Grove Plantation is part of the ACE Basin National Wildlife Refuge.  With thousands of acres of land, I was sure I could find a few subjects.  I parked near the kiosk and quickly scouted the area near the entrance.  The fields on both sides of the road leading to the mansion (which is also the Wildlife Refuge Headquarters) had plenty of macro subjects in them.  While I prefer early morning light, a deflector can help calm the harsh afternoon light when shooting macro subjects.  Using a plamp helped keep subjects steady, but with a wind speed around nine miles per hour and quickly changing light due to partially cloudy skies, the conditions were one of the most challenging I’ve ever worked through.  In those circumstances, patience is your best asset.

 

Macro abstract Thistle in The Grove Plantation near Adams Run, South Carolina
Gold Strips

To purchase a print of Gold Strips click here
To view a larger version of Gold Strips click here

The gold tones and wispy curves of the naturally abstract pattern on the thistle head in my Golden Strips piece grabbed me and wouldn’t let me go until I had created a composition.  I’ve always like abstracts, but I seem to have found an even greater attraction to them that steadily increased throughout the year.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and individual hairs to be seen.

 

 

Macro abstract Thistle in The Grove Plantation near Adams Run, South Carolina
Expansive

To purchase a print of Expansive click here
To view a larger version of Expansive click here

The thistle in Expansive reminded me of an explosion.  It seemed to be bursting out and expanding in all directions from the center.  The hairy, string-like filaments that run throughout the focal plane added to the abstract quality.  I placed the center of the flower very near the left one third line, using the rule of thirds.  I then made the aesthetic decision to nudge the center just a bit to the right so that the left side of the frame could be filled with more of the tubular florets.  That also provided some additional space between the frame edge and the center.  The high level of detail allows pollen, surface textures, and individual hairs to be seen here too.

 

To see related pieces click here

 

After returning to the car, we drove up to the house and spent a couple of hours scouting the grounds, getting maps and brochures, etc.  Before we left, I already had ideas for what I wanted to do when we returned.

Rat Snake At Cuddo East Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Rat Ring

Rat snake at Alligator Alley in Cuddo East NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Rat Ring

To purchase a print of Rat Ring click here
To view a larger version of Rat Ring click here

On the last full day of my SC AIR trip, I spent the afternoon back in Cuddo East.  As I walked along the driving trail through Alligator Alley, I noticed a circular pattern that broke up the normal lines in a tall tree trunk at the top of an embankment above a swampy channel.  After getting a closer look, I was excited to learn that it was a rat snake in an unusual position.  Perhaps it was simply timing or the right part of the season, but I only saw three snakes the entire week, and every one of them were good sized rat snakes.  Rat Ring was the only composition I was able to create that included the snake’s head.  Though I was a significant distance away, I may have scared it because it quickly disappeared.  I like how the snake is nonchalantly, almost lazily, resting its head on the thickest part of its body.  The snake’s pose creates a calm tone and brings a peaceful sense to the piece.

 

 

To see related pieces click here

Sunset On Otter Trail At Cuddo East Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Otter Trail Sunset

Sunset on Otter Trail in Cuddo East NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Otter Trail Sunset

To purchase a print of Otter Trail Sunset click here
To view a larger version of Otter Trail Sunset click here

I noted this site along Otter Trail in Cuddo East while doing some scouting the afternoon of the third full day of my SC AIR trip.  In fact, this is very near the area where the herd of wild pigs (mentioned in a previous post) was observed.  I arrived before the golden hour to position my tripod and camera in a favorable location.  After preparing for the sun to descend into the scene, I experienced another one of the trip highlights I wrote about in a prior post.  Sitting here in this spot, watching the golden light filter down through the trees, is where I heard the coyotes wailing.  Their boisterous excitement seemed to serenade the retreating sun and add an aural element that served as icing on the cake to a wonderfully enriching time with nature.  Fighting off ever increasing numbers of mosquitos, I waited until the magic light streaked across the duckweed covered canal and completely enveloped the opening at the tree line in the background before creating the composition in Otter Trail Sunset.

 

To see related pieces click here

Alligator Family At Cuddo East Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Gator Alley Family

Gators at Alligator Alley in Cuddo East NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Gator Alley Family

To purchase a print of Gator Alley Family click here
To view a larger version of Gator Alley Family click here

I referred to the piece in this post previously when writing about how superb the Cuddo East Unit of Santee NWR is.  I returned there after a break for lunch during the third full day of my SC AIR trip, and continued to be elated with both the photographic opportunities and by the experience itself.

The alligators in Gator Alley Family were found just before the sign for Alligator Alley, which I felt was quite appropriate.  Before this piece was composed, at least six of the small hatchlings were spotted along with several of their older siblings.  Most of the junk and debris on the surface was created when the cow leaped into the water from the bank she had been sunning on while watching over her hatchlings.  A polarizing filter was used to cut the glare on the water and make her easier to see.  The hatchlings (one older and one quite a bit smaller and younger) appear fairly content to lie on the log and catch some rays while their mother stands ever vigilantly on guard in protection mode.

 

To see related pieces click here

Red Clover At Cuddo East Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Paint Brush

Macro Red Clover at Cuddo East NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Paint Brush

To purchase a print of Paint Brush click here
To view a larger version of Paint Brush click here

After some scouting and composition within the Cuddo East Unit the morning of my third full day of the SC AIR trip, I returned that afternoon and spent the rest of the day there.  In one particular area along the driving trail, the Red Clovers (with their bright colors) were fairly abundant and they called out to me like someone waving a flag.  Being a professed color junkie, I was compelled to investigate what had forcibly directed my attention to them.  The subject in Paint Brush gave the impression of exactly what the title implies; a brush loaded with colorful paint.

 

I normally find afternoon sun to be overly hard and prefer to compose in the morning when the light is better and there is less wind.  However, there are methods an artist can employ to help reduce both the harshness of midday light and breeze induced movement that are especially effective where macro creations are concerned.  I used my largest diffuser to hold back the light both on the subject and the background.  Since yellow is complementary to red, I positioned the camera to take advantage of as much of the color as I could get in the background.  A high level of detail was captured, which allows surface texture and individual hairs to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

Abstract Plant At Cuddo East Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Hair Ball

The third full day of my SC AIR trip was fantastic.  That was due, in large part, to how awesome the Cuddo East Unit of Santee NWR is.  The diversity of that area is fantastic and offered many photographic opportunities as well as several highlights of the entire trip.  Hearing the coyotes howl and carry on near dusk, watching a herd of wild pigs, realizing that the noise that sounded like truck tires singing on a nearby highway that continued to grow louder the darker it got was actually coming from millions of mosquitos, seeing the largest gator since moving to the CSRA after checking out a whole family of them (babies, mother, and siblings) in Alligator Alley are all events that I will never forget.

 

Macro abstract plant at Cuddo East NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Hair Ball

To purchase a print of Hair Ball click here
To view a larger version of Hair Ball click here

I was lucky that my schedule put me in Cuddo East just before the maintenance folks came through with their brush hog and chopped down everything that was growing along the driving trails.  Spring had definitely sprung in that area and the fields were full of different types of flowering weeds.  Access was easy since the plants were just a couple of steps off the road.  The hardest part (which wasn’t that difficult and would have been even easier with a truck or an SUV) was finding a suitable location to park so that the driving trail wasn’t being blocked.

 

The seeds in the head of Hair Ball got my initial attention because they formed such a thick, round, full shape.  It reminded me of a Dandelion, but was much more robust.  Zooming down into it gives a fascinating look at what is waiting to be carried off by the wind and results in an abstract composition full of lines, arcs, and sweeping hairs.

 

To see related pieces click here

Abstract Sediment At Dingle Pond Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Water Colors

Macro abstract water and stream bottom at Dingle Pond Unit NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Water Colors

To purchase a print of Water Colors click here
To view a larger version of Water Colors click here

During the second full day of my SC AIR trip, I was headed back toward the car after hiking through the trails of the Dingle Pond Unit.  While I searched for another scene like the one in Dingle Pond Color Flow, I discovered an equally exciting but completely different type of opportunity.  The abstract lines, colors, and patterns in my Water Colors piece come from what lies beneath the water running through the area.  The grains of sand and colorful sediment show a pattern of flow and movement as the force of water drifting across this spot randomly redistributes the tiny particles.  The work was composed in a manner that allowed the shades to follow that same current from the darker bottom to the lighter top as if the water had an ability to influence the direction the colors flowed.

 

To see related pieces click here

Fern At Dingle Pond Unit Of Santee NWR In Summerton, SC

Sprung

Macro Fern at Dingle Pond Unit NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Sprung

To purchase a print of Sprung click here
To view a larger version of Sprung click here

I came across the fern in Sprung on one of the hiking trails in Dingle Pond Unit the second day of my SC AIR trip.  The curvature of the leaves from left to right provide an impression of smiles stacked on top of each other, which gives the piece a joyful feeling.  If I was a fern, I’d be happy to finally be unfurled and able to soak up some spring sunshine.  The coating of white hairs, like a type of down, speaks to a new beginning with thoughts of a bright future.  The high level of detail allows surface texture, veins, and individual hairs to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

Stream In Dingle Pond Unit Of Santee NWR

Dingle Pond Color Flow

Stream at Dingle Pond Unit NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Dingle Pond Color Flow

To purchase a print of Dingle Pond Color Flow click here
To view a larger version of Dingle Pond Color Flow click here

On the second full day of my SC AIR trip, I continued to explore the Santee NWR units.  I wasn’t sure what I would find, but was delighted when presented with the scene in Dingle Pond Color Flow.  Though I didn’t have the magic light associated with a sunrise or sunset, the lighting was still quite special.  The oranges and reds in the water were similar to other areas I’ve been where plant decay produces fantastic color combinations (e.g., my Swamp Reflections piece).  Normally, afternoon light is simply too harsh for my tastes, but thanks to some passing clouds, the diffusion was enough to allow a composition to be found.  Getting the colors from trees and sky reflecting off the water as well as all of the light from the background trees to coalesce with the foreground colors required a High Dynamic Range (HDR) image.  It has an inviting sense of warmth and feels like a place where you could easily spend time relaxing and taking in the beauty and wonder nature has to offer.

 

To see related pieces click here

Honeysuckle At Bluff Unit National Wildlife Refuge Near Santee, SC

Bluff Unit Honeysuckle

Macro Honeysuckle at Bluff Unit NWR in Summerton, South Carolina
Bluff Unit Honeysuckle

To purchase a print of Bluff Unit Honeysuckle click here
To view a larger version of Bluff Unit Honeysuckle click here

I created Bluff Unit Honeysuckle, while waiting for the sun to set, near the Santee NWR visitor center in the early evening of the first full day of my South Carolina Artist In Residence (AIR) trip.  The piece has a joyful mood as the angles of the Honeysuckle pair and the curves of their filaments make them appear to be happily dancing.  The high level of detail allows surface texture, contours, individual hairs, and pollen particles to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here