Macro Fall Pansy At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Dew Point

 

Macro Pansy at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Dew Point

To purchase a print of Dew Point click here
To view a larger version of Dew Point click here

I just realized, as I was writing this, that I ended the season at the exact same place I started with an identical type of flower.  Patsy’s Garden in the Rye Patch Rose Garden had been recently replanted with pansies.  Artistically pleasing specimens were fairly sparse, but this one stood out.  I liked the colors (of course), but the tiny dew drops made the difference.  The petal surfaces are nearly completely covered resulting in a sparkling effect.  Aesthetically, I placed the green heart in the center of the flower just below the bottom one third line, using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.  The high level of detail allows surface texture, individual dew drops, and individual pollen pieces to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro Berries And Fall Leaves At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Fall Berries

 

Macro berries and fall leaves at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Fall Berries

To purchase a print of Fall Berries click here
To view a larger version of Fall Berries click here

The leaves on the tree where my Fall Berries piece was created can be quite colorful in the Fall.  They were, as they have been in the past, loud enough to call me over from across the lawn at the Rye Patch.  I searched around the tree for artistically pleasing scenes.  I wanted good colors in the leaves and at least one berry.  For the scene I settled on, I liked how the dark colors of the berries contrasted nicely against the brighter leaves as well as their mixture of purples with the blue reflections.  Aesthetically, I found a perspective that kept the berries from touching each other.  Then I placed the left most berry on the first lower left crossing line (a little off center), using the rule of thirds, and used it as my focal point.

 

I normally try to get as much depth of field as I possibly can, but sometimes I have to dial back the F-stop setting.  As I’ve posted about previously, photography is about concession management.  The wind picked up just as I began exploring the leaves.  With the sun not yet able to provide much light through the surrounding trees, I needed several seconds of exposure time.  But, Mother Nature insisted on rustling the leaves with a breeze coming on shorter intervals than what I required.  To come to an equitable agreement with her, I dropped my F-stop down to F/11 which cut my exposure time down to two seconds.  Voila, everybody was happy.  And, as a bonus, the background leaves nearly completely dissolved down into simple colors.  Even with a shallow depth of field, the high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

 

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro fall colored leaf at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina

Blown In

Blown In

To purchase a print of Blown In click here
To view a larger version of Blown In click here

Though Fall was just a week old, the colorful leaf in my Blown In piece was a clear indicator that more color would soon be on its way.  In fact, those colors stopped me dead in my tracks as I was walking up the sidewalk on the east side of the Rye Patch.  The leaf contrasted nicely against the darker leaves on the small bushes that line that side of the building.  It’s fair to say that it was conspicuous, though I wasn’t sure where it came from, and I didn’t see any other leaves with that much color (even after scanning the nearby trees).  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

To see related pieces click here

Macro Tree Flowers At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Tree Flowers

 

Macro tree flower at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Stigma Star

To purchase a print of Stigma Star click here
To view a larger version of Stigma Star click here

White blossoms on a small tree called to me from across the Rye Patch lawn.  I’ve never seen a bloom like these in that area before, but I don’t think that it has been planted there for very long.  In fact, the tree itself was only a couple of feet taller than I am.  The honey bees just loved the flowers and were all over them.  After more closely examining one, I loved the star shaped stigma surrounded by the bright orange and yellow anthers and filaments.  For my Stigma Star composition, I utilized the stigma as my focal point and placed it on the right most line using the rule of thirds (just a little off center).  I wanted to keep as many of the anthers in the frame as possible so the lens was moved slightly right to accommodate that aesthetic desire.  The high level of detail allows surface textures on the stigma and anthers to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here.

 

 

Macro tree flowers at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Tree Flowers

To purchase a print of Tree Flowers click here
To view a larger version of Tree Flowers click here

After successfully creating a macro version of one of the flowers, I wanted my Tree Flowers composition to show them blooming on the tree.  I had to fight a bit more wind to get it, but luckily there was enough light to where I could keep my shutter speed under a second while maintaining a decent depth of field setting.  Interestingly, it appears that only one of the flower’s petals has a fuzzy/furry edge.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs (around a petal edge) and surface textures to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro Abstract Tree Growth At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Ogre Skin

Macro abstract growth on tree at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Ogre Skin

To purchase a print of Ogre Skin click here
To view a larger version of Ogre Skin click here

I discovered the growth in my Ogre Skin piece on a tree at the Rye Patch.  I’m not sure what it is (perhaps some type of moss), but the green colors and pocked, bumpy surface looked pretty cool at two times life-size.  I immediately thought that this could be what the skin of an ogre or ugly troll looks like close up.  I searched for an area that had a good amount of festering, open pits, and additional colors while keeping height differences moderated (due to the extremely shallow depth of field and my desire to attain as much sharpness as possible).

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro Flowers At Rye Patch in Aiken, SC

Screams

Macro flowers at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Screams

To purchase a print of Screams click here
To view a larger version of Screams click here

I discovered the subjects in my Screams piece on the north side of the Rye Patch in a small garden area just off the driveway.  The bright white colors pulled me in.  In the interest of full disclosure, I was ready to point my camera at just about anything I could find because I was testing out a replacement head.  I use an Arca Swiss B1 (an original that I’ve had for more than a decade), and I just couldn’t work around the dreaded Freeze Up problem combined with a barely functional panorama locking screw any longer.  Simply put, the issues were causing me to burn through too much golden hour light fiddling with the head while trying to place the frame precisely where I wanted.  The bad news is that, over the course of a couple of weeks, I tested several heads and I wasn’t happy with ANY of them.  The good news is that Bob Watkins over at Precision Camera Works  performed his magic and fixed up my B1 just like it was new again.  And, it was repaired under warranty so it didn’t cost me anything.  I think it’s working better than it ever did.

 

Test or not, seeing these little flowers through the lens at two times life-size was enticing.  In my mind’s eye, the centers of the flowers resembled wide open mouths and the pearl colored structures just under the top of the center ellipse looked like snaggleteeth.  Because of the shape, the yellow and green area reminded me of a tongue.  They give the appearance of permanently yelling at the top of their lungs.  The high level of detail allows individual hairs to be seen (especially along the petal edges).

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro Abstract Magnolia Stamen At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Stamen Pile

Macro abstract fallen Magnolia stamen laying in petal at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Stamen Pile

To purchase a print of Stamen Pile click here
To view a larger version of Stamen Pile click here

Stamen Pile is similar to a horizontal composition I created at Hopeland Gardens several years ago.  Both are abstract and feature magnolia stamens that have fallen away and landed on a petal inside the flower.  This scene was found on the side of the Rye Patch driveway and has fewer stamen than my previous piece.  I find it interesting how the stamen are essentially cast off after having performed their function but then collected by the flower (as if going to the ground as a group was better or more important than falling independently).  I’m sure Mother Nature has a perfectly reasonable explanation for this behavior and perhaps some botanist could provide an answer, but, for me, I’ll simply enjoy the mystery and the random design they create.  The high level of detail allows surface textures and individual pieces of pollen to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

New Growth Leaves At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Baby Tree

New growth tree at the Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Baby Tree

To purchase a print of Baby Tree click here
To view a larger version of Baby Tree click here

The small leaves in my Baby Tree piece were on the side of the Rye Patch Rose Garden (between it and Berrie road) in the open grassy area.  There was lots of this new growth scattered all through that yard.  I’m not sure what it is, but the color immediately caught my eye.  The brilliant reds were impossible to miss.  I searched around until I found one that was tall enough to get it up and as far away from the ground as possible (which wasn’t easy because they didn’t appear to be very old and were fairly short) and that had a background with complimentary colors.  Even after finding the one that best met my criteria, the diminutive size meant that it was quite close to the background.  To combat that, I composed with the lens wide open to reduce the depth of field as much as possible.  Even though it was created with the shallowest depth, the high level of detail allows surface texture and individual hairs to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro Abstract Wet Rose At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC

Swirled

Macro abstract wet Rose petals at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Swirled

To purchase a print of Swirled click here
To view a larger version of Swirled click here

I was attracted to the rose in my Swirled piece by the random and chaotic colors.  I also liked the abstract pattern of the petals I found upon viewing the scene at two times life-size.  It was quite wet – in fact, it had standing water in the center and the petals were literally covered in drops.  All of that water and the many drops add to the overall abstract feel.

 

To see related pieces click here

Macro Pansies At Rye Patch In Aiken, SC: Part 5

Rye Patch Pansies: Part 5

Part 5 is a continuation of the Rye Patch Pansies blog posts.  To see works from or read The Artist’s Story for Part 4, click here.

Having learned that there was an automatic sprinkler system for Patsy’s Garden, I used that to my advantage the next time I visited.  I knew approximately what time it finished spraying so I composed in other nearby areas before returning to find the pansies freshly watered.

 

Macro abstract Pansy at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Soaked

To purchase a print of Soaked click here
To view a larger version of Soaked click here

I loved the colors and the abundance of water drops in my Soaked piece.  I decided to take an artistic turn with this composition.  Previously, in most cases, I had been concerned with the flower as the subject and ensuring that it remained that way (even to the degree of specifically placing the focal point where the main subject received the desired amount of attention).  But with so many cool looking drops with great colors and nice reflections, I flipped the script.  I decided that the flower would make a very colorful background for the drops.  Pushing the flower into the background meant that the focus could be shifted to the drops (e.g., pulling them into the frame and being cognizant of where they might leave it as well as ensuring that, as much as possible, they be kept in the zone of sharpness).  So, frame placement was all about getting the drops I wanted, and I wasn’t really concerned with utilizing the rule of thirds.  I love how it turned out, and it is one of my favorites from the season.

 

 

Macro abstract Pansy at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Pretty Wet

To purchase a print of Pretty Wet click here
To view a larger version of Pretty Wet click here

I was attracted to the colors, the amount of drops, and the abstract feel of the tiny scene in my Pretty Wet composition.  There was a bit more of a focal point fight going on here compared to the previous piece.  While I wanted the large drop just left of the center in the zone of sharpness, I also wanted the lateral hairs to be sharp (primarily because their crystalline structure has a similar tone and I like their detail and ability to add visual interest).  Once again, I really liked the reflections, and, in the larger print sizes, you can easily see me holding the diffuser to calm the light down.  Due to how the right lateral petal had been folded down, I was able to place the bottom, left most crossing line, using the rule of thirds, nearly at the center of the green heart in the flower’s core.  That aesthetic decision allowed the drops on both lateral petals to fit nicely into the frame and pulled additional color into the background from flowers planted behind the subject.  The high level of detail allows surface textures to be seen.

 

To see related pieces click here

 

 

Macro Pansy at Rye Patch in Aiken, South Carolina
Color Run

To purchase a print of Color Run click here
To view a larger version of Color Run click here

I loved the colors and the large drop on the pansy in my Color Run piece.  The drop flowing down from the flower’s center was so prominent that I had to put it firmly in the zone of sharpness.  Luckily, that focal point was approximately the same distance from the camera’s sensor as the green heart in the flower’s core.  That also made the aesthetic choice of placing the top one third line, using the rule of thirds, across that feature an easy decision.

 

To see related pieces click here